Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

When you want to print a bunch of variables in Python, you have quite a few options, such as:

for i in range(len(iterable)):
    print iterable[i].name

OR

map(lambda i: sys.stdout.write(i.name), iterable)

The reason I use sys.stdout.write instead of print in the second example is that lambdas won't accept print, but sys.stdout.write serves the same purpose.

You can also print conditionally with the ternary operator:

map(lambda n: None if n % 2 else sys.stdout.write(str(n)), range(1, 100))

So it would be really handy if I could check an entire sequence for a condition that would warrant an exception in such a way:

map(lambda o: raise InvalidObjectError, o.name if not o.isValid else o(), iterable)

But that doesn't work. Is there such an object for raise in Python, and if so, where is it?

share|improve this question
1  
-1: Wow that's all bad. Please don't play code golf like that. Please do not make Python unreadable. What's wrong with the first style? It made sense. Why use bizarre map techniques that make things obscure? What's the point of all this obscurity? It won't be faster. It won't be easier to read. Why do this? –  S.Lott Sep 17 '10 at 10:05
    
@S. Lott the first two map examples are admittedly useless, but they were only to demonstrate sys.stoud.write and the way I want to use raise. But I don't see why the third map would be bad if it were possible. –  cory Sep 17 '10 at 15:53
    
why use sys.stdout.write when you can use from __future__ import print_function? –  S.Lott Sep 17 '10 at 17:28
    
Also a good choice. Too bad there isn't a raise_function in the futures yet. –  cory Sep 17 '10 at 19:48

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

There is no Python "object" (built-in or in the standard library) for raise, you have to build one yourself (typical short snippet that goes in one's util.py...!):

def do_raise(exc): raise exc

typically to be called as do_raise(InvalidObjectError(o.name)).

share|improve this answer
    
I cringe at the name do_raise –  Gabe Sep 17 '10 at 3:56
2  
The conventional way to use a Python keyword as an identifier would be raise_. –  Josh Lee Sep 17 '10 at 4:14
    
@Gabe: Perhaps you should cringe at a situation for which this is the accepted answer. –  S.Lott Sep 17 '10 at 10:22

I don't think it's possible to use raise in a lambda, like you're attempting to do. raise is a statement/expression, not an object. As @Alex Martelli has stated, you'd likely need to define a function to do the check for you. Now, the function could be declared locally, within the same context.

As far as the exception types, which is what your question seems to be aimed at: Exception types are not defined automatically. For simple exception types, where you either want just a text message, or none at all, typically exception types are defined simply at your module/file scope as:

class InvalidObjectError(Exception): pass
share|improve this answer
    
Actually the first part of your answer is right, I did want to know if there was an object for the raise statement like there is for the print statement. –  cory Sep 17 '10 at 3:00
    
"I don't think it's possible to use raise in a lambda, like you're attempting to do. raise is a statement/expression, not an object. " One could argue that this means python is just not functional enough. –  g33kz0r May 14 '12 at 4:11

Do. Not. Do. This.

This is a dreadful idea.

map(lambda o: raise InvalidObjectError, o.name if not o.isValid else o(), iterable)

Do this.

class SomeValidatingClass( object ):
    def isValid( self ):
        try: 
            self.validate()
        except InvalidObjectError:
            return False
        return True
    def validate( self ):
        """raises InvalidObjectErorr if there's a problem."""

[ x.validate() for x in iterable ]

No map. No lambda. Same behavior.

share|improve this answer
    
What's wrong with map and lambda? It seems to me that you would also recommend using a for loop and an if statement instead of filter(), which only serves (in my eyes) to draw out the process. –  cory Sep 17 '10 at 19:22
    
@cory: filter is hardly comparable to this. The use of lambda to attempt to raise an exception is too complex. Not a comment on filtering. Only commenting on your exact use case. The actual validation is much, much simpler here. No Map. No Lambda. [ x.validate() for x in iterable ]. And you have your exception raised if any object is invalid. Done. No map. No Lambda. –  S.Lott Sep 17 '10 at 19:58

For your first example I use form like this:

print '\n'.join(obj.name for obj in iterable)

Also I would use:

firstnotvalid = next(obj.name for obj in iterable if not obj.is_valid())

And instead of:

>>> import sys
>>> map(lambda n: None if n % 2 else sys.stdout.write(str(n)), range(1, 100))
2468101214161820222426283032343638404244464850525456586062646668707274767880828486889092949698[None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None]

I would do:

>>> print (', '.join(str(number) for number in range(1,100) if not number % 2))
2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, 16, 18, 20, 22, 24, 26, 28, 30, 32, 34, 36, 38, 40, 42, 44, 46, 48, 50, 52, 54, 56, 58, 60, 62, 64, 66, 68, 70, 72, 74, 76, 78, 80, 82, 84, 86, 88, 90, 92, 94, 96, 98

Ignoring that there is step parameter for range, as I think the function is simplification of other more complicated functions.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.