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I am an SQL rookie and I would very much appreciate some assistance on this rather basic issue.

select comp_table.*
from (select column_1,avg(column_2) as "avg"
      from table_1, group by column_1) comp_table

→ returns correct records with 2 columns named column_1 and avg

But if I change to:

select comp_table.avg
from (select column_1,avg(column_2) as "avg"
      from table_1, group by column_1) comp_table

→ returns Error: Invalid identifier "avg"

The thing is I only need to select the avg column, so I cannot do select comp_table.*. Can you guys please help?

Also, if you could kindly provide some tuning tips for the query, that would be awesome.

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2  
@John Kugelman: → nice! –  egrunin Sep 17 '10 at 4:29
    
Sounds like this is ORA-00904: Invalid Identifier‌​... –  OMG Ponies Sep 17 '10 at 4:48

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

When the column name is not enclosed in "double quotes", the name is normalized to uppercase; therefore, you were asking for column "AVG", whereas the column name is actually "avg":

select comp_table."avg"
from (select column_1,avg(column_2) as "avg"
  from table_1, group by column_1) comp_table
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1  
in fact, I double-quote column identifiers only if I'd like to name them in my native language, otherwise I leave them "as is". It would also be a good practice not to use identifiers that match oracle function names like sum or avg, to avoid possible confusions. –  be here now Sep 17 '10 at 7:56
    
In PostgreSQL enclose a columnname in double quote makes it case-sensitive, ie "mycolunm" differs from "myColumn". I don't know if it's the same for other databases. –  M42 Sep 17 '10 at 14:31
    
In Oracle, it's a bit different. ALL columns are specified using double-quotes (in a sense) - it's just that they give us a short-cut that means we can omit the double-quotes if the column only includes uppercase letters and/or underscore characters. It's a common convention, however, to only use the non-quoted syntax for naming columns in Oracle. –  Jeffrey Kemp Sep 20 '10 at 4:52

What database server are you using? AVG is a built-in function in all the ones I know of, so you would need to escape it correctly - which depends on database server. In MS SQL Server it's [avg]

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Then the error would've been that the AVG function is missing a parameter. On top of the table alias use... –  OMG Ponies Sep 17 '10 at 4:29

I don't know which DBMS you're using, but some will get upset that you are using .avg (because avg is reserved) and require you to escape it.

Try changing it from avg to average, just as a test:

SELECT comp_table.average
FROM (SELECT column_1, avg(column_2) as average
      FROM table_1, GROUP BY column_1) comp_table
share|improve this answer
    
Then the error would've been that the AVG function is missing a parameter. On top of the table alias use... –  OMG Ponies Sep 17 '10 at 4:30
    
TSQL is the only one I know of that supports square brackets to escape table, column and aliase names, which as Emtucifor pointed out--SQL Server wouldn't have this issue. –  OMG Ponies Sep 17 '10 at 4:38
    
@OMG Ponies: fixed. –  egrunin Sep 17 '10 at 13:59

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