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Form the below string I would like to get the index of the starting number.Please let me know how this can be done in C#.net.

For example -

University of California, 1980-85.
University of Colorado, 1999-02

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please post your code attempt so far.... –  Mitch Wheat Sep 17 '10 at 5:18
    
do you want the position of the first number? –  griegs Sep 17 '10 at 5:20
    
yes, I want to get the first position of the number in each string. –  Cool Coder Sep 17 '10 at 5:23
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3 Answers

up vote 13 down vote accepted
using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;

namespace IndexOfAny
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("University of California, 1980-85".IndexOfAny("0123456789".ToCharArray()));
        }
    }
}
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Following might help you to achieve your task

Regex re = new Regex(@"\d+");
Match m = re.Match(txtFindNumber.Text);
if (m.Success) 
{
    lblResults.Text = string.Format("RegEx found " + m.Value + " at position " + m.Index.ToString());
}
else 
{
    lblResults.Text = "You didn't enter a string containing a number!";
}
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Not sure if this is the fastest way (I assume it has to be faster than Regex) but you can just do it with a 1 liner using the built in string method IndexOfAny:

string yourString = "University of California, 1980-85";
int index = yourString.IndexOfAny(new char[]
    { '0', '1', '2', '3', '4', '5', '6', '7', '8', '9' });
// index = 26
// if nothing found it would be -1

EDIT: My method seems to be much faster in a simple test I did:

string test = "University of California, 1980-85";

System.Diagnostics.Stopwatch watch = new System.Diagnostics.Stopwatch();
long totalTicks1 = 0;
long totalTicks2 = 0;
char[] testChars = new char[] { '0', '1', '2', '3', '4', '5', '6', '7', '8', '9' };
Regex re = new Regex(@"\d+");
for (int i = 0; i < 1000; i++)
{
    watch.Reset();
    watch.Start();
    Match m = re.Match(test);
    watch.Stop();
    totalTicks1 += watch.ElapsedTicks;

    watch.Reset();
    watch.Start();
    int index = test.IndexOfAny(testChars);
    watch.Stop();
    totalTicks2 += watch.ElapsedTicks;
}

Run result 1:

Regex totalTicks1 = 4851
IndexOfAny totalTicks2 = 1472

Run result 2:

Regex totalTicks1 = 5578
IndexOfAny totalTicks2 = 1470

Run result 3:

Regex totalTicks1 = 5441
IndexOfAny totalTicks2 = 1481

This looks like a significant difference. I wonder how it would be affected by different lengths of strings as well... I try to stay away from Regex except in situations where I am truly looking for some type of complex pattern as it always seems real slow.

EDIT 2: Fixed up test to make it more accurate with the char[] and Regex predefined outside of the loop.

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I like the answer. Thanks –  Cool Coder Sep 17 '10 at 5:35
    
you have to run it a few thousand times to get any kind of accuracy, methinks. –  Mark Sep 17 '10 at 5:35
    
@Mark I just did a test of that... mean while you ninja'd my answer :P –  Kelsey Sep 17 '10 at 5:48
    
*blushes* I don't deserve the check.. I just figured there had to be a better way than writing out the numbers like that. That's way too much typing. If it's any consolation.. I did think of it too. –  Mark Sep 17 '10 at 6:27
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