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How can a string be validated in Java? I.e. only characters are allowed and not numbers? How about email validation?

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4  
You might look into Regular Expressions: download.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/essential/regex –  MatrixFrog Sep 17 '10 at 5:20

4 Answers 4

how a string can be validated in java?

A common way to do that is by using a regex, or Regular Expression. In Java you can use the String.matches(String regex) method. With regexes we say you match a string against a pattern If a match is successful, .matches() returns true.


only characters allowed and not numbers?

// You can use this pattern:
String regex = "^[a-zA-Z]+$";
if (str.matches(regex)) { 
    // ...
}

email validation?

Email addresses have a very complicated spec, which requires a monstrous regex to be accurate. This one is decent and short, but not exactly right:

String regex = "\\b[A-Z0-9._%+-]+@[A-Z0-9.-]+\\.[A-Z]{2,4}\\b";
if (str.matches(regex)) { 
    // ...
}

If you really want to look into it: How to validate email and Comparing email validating regexes (PHP).


Here's an excellent resource to get started on regex:
http://www.regular-expressions.info

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For simple cases like that, go with RegExp as NullUserException already suggested. If you need more robust solution you can use some validation framework, i.e. Apache Commons Validator.

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for string with only characters try

private boolean verifyLastName(String lname)
{
    lname = lname.trim();

    if(lname == null || lname.equals(""))
        return false;

    if(!lname.matches("[a-zA-Z]*"))
        return false;

    return true;
}

for email validation try

private boolean verifyEmail(String email)
{
    email = email.trim();

    if(email == null || email.equals(""))
        return false;

    if(!email.matches("^[a-zA-Z0-9._%+-]+@[a-zA-Z0-9.-]+\\.[a-zA-Z]{2,6}$"))
        return false;

    return true;
}
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1  
There's really no point in checking for an empty string or trimming it because you can take care of those with regex. –  NullUserException Sep 17 '10 at 5:41
    
I agree with NUE –  jsshah Sep 17 '10 at 5:57
    
the trim should be done AFTER the null check...or else you'll throw NullPointerException... –  st0le Sep 17 '10 at 8:08

If you have Apache commons-lang as a project dependency (and that is quite usual), you can use StringUtils.isAlpha(). If you have a more specific validation or do not want a dependency on commons-lang, you can do it with regular expressions and String.matches().

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