Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Currently I'm working with some libraries applying deferred execution via iterators. In some situations I have the need to "forward" the recieved iterator simply. I.e. I have to get the IEnumerable<T> instance from the called method and return it immediately.

Now my question: Is there a relevant difference between simply returning the recieved IEnumerable<T> or re-yielding it via a loop?

IEnumerable<int> GetByReturn()
{
    return GetIterator(); // GetIterator() returns IEnumerable<int>
}
// or:
IEnumerable<int> GetByReYielding()
{
    for(var item in GetIterator()) // GetIterator() returns IEnumerable<int>
    {
        yield return item;
    }
}
share|improve this question
2  
What is the advantage of re-yielding? If you want to perform some action on the items, you won't get around looping, right? If not, why not use the shorter-code-version? –  Martin Sep 17 '10 at 7:24
    
I conclude from my experiments (and IL inspection), that the execution of GetByReYielding() will be deferred itself (independent of the way GetIterator() works), but the execution of GetByReturn() not. That's all. –  Nico Sep 17 '10 at 11:44

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

There isn't any relevant difference (aside from maybe performance) between the two since you're not doing anything with the enumerator from GetIterator(). It would only make sense to re-yield if you were going to do something with the enumerator, like filter it.

share|improve this answer

It may be worth your while reading Jon Skeet's article on C# Iterators. It's quite informative.

http://csharpindepth.com/Articles/Chapter6/IteratorBlockImplementation.aspx

share|improve this answer

They ARE different. For example, if the GetIterator() declared as:

IEnumerable<int> GetIterator() {
    List<int> result = new List<int>();
    for(int i = 0; i < 1000; i++) {
        result.Add(i);
    }
    return result;
}

If you do not do re-yielding, the GetIterator() and the loop got executed immediately. Therefore, the answer depends on how you implement GetIterator(). If it is certain that GetIterator() will be yielding, so there is no point re-yielding it.

share|improve this answer
2  
Even if he uses an iterator, it will still loop through the whole list before the first yield. –  Mark Cidade Sep 17 '10 at 7:53

I don't see there any relevant difference other than code bloating.

share|improve this answer

There is a relevant difference.

The execution of GetByReYielding() will be executed in a deferred manner (as it is an iterator block). If you used a parameter in GetByReturn() or GetByReYielding() and checked that parameter at runtime for nullity (or did any other validation), this check would be done immediately when GetByReturn() is called but not immediately when GetByReYielding() is called! The validation in GetByReYielding() would be performed the deferred way, when the result is iterated. - This is often, well, "too late". See here:

// Checks parameters early. - Fine. The passed argument will be checked directly when
// GetByReturn() is called.
IEnumerable<int> GetByReturn(IEnumerable<int> sequence)
{
    if(null == sequence)
    {
        throw new ArgumentNullException("sequence");
    }

    return GetIterator();
}
// Checks parameters in a deferred manner. - Possibly not desired, it's "too" late. I.e.                 // when the    
// result is iterated somewhere in a completely different location in your code the 
// argument passed once will be checked.
IEnumerable<int> GetByReYielding(IEnumerable<int> sequence)
{
    if(null == sequence)
    {
        throw new ArgumentNullException("sequence");
    }

    for(var item in GetIterator()) 
    {
        yield return item;
    }
}

Mr. Skeet explained this concept in http://msmvps.com/blogs/jon_skeet/archive/2010/09/03/reimplementing-linq-to-objects-part-2-quot-where-quot.aspx. The standard query operators provided in .Net use non-deferred wrapper functions (e.g. Where()) that check parameters and then call the core iterator function (as I showed in my implementation of GetByReturn()).

I hope this helps.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.