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The best I can come up with for now is this monstrosity:

>>> datetime.utcnow() \
...   .replace(tzinfo=pytz.UTC) \
...   .astimezone(pytz.timezone("Australia/Melbourne")) \
...   .replace(hour=0,minute=0,second=0,microsecond=0) \
...   .astimezone(pytz.UTC) \
...   .replace(tzinfo=None)
datetime.datetime(2008, 12, 16, 13, 0)

I.e., in English, get the current time (in UTC), convert it to some other timezone, set the time to midnight, then convert back to UTC.

I'm not just using now() or localtime() as that would use the server's timezone, not the user's timezone.

I can't help feeling I'm missing something, any ideas?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 13 down vote accepted

I think you can shave off a few method calls if you do it like this:

>>> from datetime import datetime
>>> datetime.now(pytz.timezone("Australia/Melbourne")) \
            .replace(hour=0, minute=0, second=0, microsecond=0) \
            .astimezone(pytz.utc)

BUT… there is a bigger problem than aesthetics in your code: it will give the wrong result on the day of the switch to or from Daylight Saving Time.

The reason for this is that neither the datetime constructors nor replace() take DST changes into account.

For example:

>>> now = datetime(2012, 4, 1, 5, 0, 0, 0, tzinfo=pytz.timezone("Australia/Melbourne"))
>>> print now
2012-04-01 05:00:00+10:00
>>> print now.replace(hour=0)
2012-04-01 00:00:00+10:00 # wrong! midnight was at 2012-04-01 00:00:00+11:00
>>> print datetime(2012, 3, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, tzinfo=tz)
2012-03-01 00:00:00+10:00 # wrong again!

However, the documentation for tz.localize() states:

This method should be used to construct localtimes, rather than passing a tzinfo argument to a datetime constructor.

Thus, your problem is solved like so:

>>> import pytz
>>> from datetime import datetime, date, time

>>> tz = pytz.timezone("Australia/Melbourne")
>>> the_date = date(2012, 4, 1) # use date.today() here

>>> midnight_without_tzinfo = datetime.combine(the_date, time())
>>> print midnight_without_tzinfo
2012-04-01 00:00:00

>>> midnight_with_tzinfo = tz.localize(midnight_without_tzinfo)
>>> print midnight_with_tzinfo
2012-04-01 00:00:00+11:00

>>> print midnight_with_tzinfo.astimezone(pytz.utc)
2012-03-31 13:00:00+00:00

No guarantees for dates before 1582, though.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, that's definitely neater and a little more self-descriptive. –  Tom Dec 19 '08 at 23:12
2  
don't forget millisecond –  joeforker Feb 1 '10 at 20:51
    
it seems it ignores DST. Somewhere .localize()/.normalize() might be necessary. –  J.F. Sebastian Jun 22 '12 at 3:16
    
@J.F.Sebastian: interesting! are you sure? do you have an example? it's entirely possible. –  hop Jun 22 '12 at 10:29
    
@hop: yes. Your code fails on Apr 1, 2012. See my answer –  J.F. Sebastian Jun 27 '12 at 23:58

@hop's answer is wrong on the day of transition from Daylight Saving Time (DST) e.g., Apr 1, 2012. To fix it tz.localize() could be used:

tz = pytz.timezone("Australia/Melbourne")
today = datetime.now(tz).date()
midnight = tz.localize(datetime.combine(today, time(0, 0)), is_dst=None)
utc_dt = midnight.astimezone(pytz.utc)        

The same with comments:

#!/usr/bin/env python
from datetime import datetime, time
import pytz # pip instal pytz

tz = pytz.timezone("Australia/Melbourne") # choose timezone

# 1. get correct date for the midnight using given timezone.
today = datetime.now(tz).date()

# 2. get midnight in the correct timezone (taking into account DST)
#NOTE: tzinfo=None and tz.localize()
# assert that there is no dst transition at midnight (`is_dst=None`)
midnight = tz.localize(datetime.combine(today, time(0, 0)), is_dst=None)

# 3. convert to UTC (no need to call `utc.normalize()` due to UTC has no 
#    DST transitions)
fmt = '%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S %Z%z'
print midnight.astimezone(pytz.utc).strftime(fmt)
share|improve this answer
    
I'm a bit confused. The DST switch happened at 3 a.m., so midnight on that day should still be at 14:00 UTC, not 13:00. no? –  hop Jun 28 '12 at 21:43
    
@hop: convert 2012 Mar 31 13:00 UTC to Melbourne timezone and see for yourself (it is still +11 timezone (DST), not +10 (standard)) –  J.F. Sebastian Jun 28 '12 at 22:51

Setting the TZ environment variable modifies what timezone Python's date and time functions work with.

>>> time.gmtime()
(2008, 12, 17, 1, 16, 46, 2, 352, 0)
>>> time.localtime()
(2008, 12, 16, 20, 16, 47, 1, 351, 0)
>>> os.environ['TZ']='Australia/Melbourne'
>>> time.localtime()
(2008, 12, 17, 12, 16, 53, 2, 352, 1)
share|improve this answer
    
Aside from not wanting to use the TZ variable to control this, that doesn't actually tell me how to find midnight, just the current time. –  Tom Dec 17 '08 at 1:38

Each time zone has a number, eg US/Central = -6. This is defined as the offset in hours from UTC. Since 0000 is midnight, you can simply use this offset to find the time in any time zone when it is midnight UTC. To access that, I believe you can use

 time.timezone

According to The Python Docs, time.timezone actually gives the negative value of this number:

time.timezone

The offset of the local (non-DST) timezone, in seconds west of UTC (negative in most of Western Europe, positive in the US, zero in the UK).

So you would simply use that number for the time in hours if it's positive (i.e., if it's midnight in Chicago (which has a +6 timezone value), then it's 6000 = 6am UTC).

If the number is negative, subtract from 24. For example, Berlin would give -1, so 24 - 1 => 2300 = 11pm.

share|improve this answer
    
I think you're on the right track, but how do you know what date to start with? i.e. a few hours ago, it was the 17th here in Melbourne, while it was still the 16th in UTC. –  Tom Dec 17 '08 at 1:40
    
The question is about local Midnight. The day relationship is fixed by the UTC offset for the timezone -- at local midnight. –  S.Lott Dec 17 '08 at 3:06
    
adding/substracting tz differences by hand might have issues around the switch from and to DST –  hop Dec 18 '08 at 1:40
    
If it's the number of SECONDS west, you wouldn't want to subtract it from 24... –  Powerlord Dec 19 '08 at 18:32

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