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I want to delete all the text between a pair of "};" which contains a particular keyword. What i want is

input:

}; text text KEYWORD text text };

Output:

};   };

Suggest me a simple regular expression. I know 'sed' is to be used.

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1  
en.wiktionary.org/wiki/please –  Tim Pietzcker Sep 17 '10 at 8:37
    
sorry, i was not aware of protocols. i ll keep that in mind now onwards –  sole007 Sep 17 '10 at 9:05

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This should work under most conditions:

sed '/};[^}]*};/{s/};[^}]*};/}; };/;b};/};/!b;:a;N;/\n[^}]*};/!ba;s/[^;]*\n.*\n[^}]*/ /' inputfile

There will probably be some corner cases where this fails. Change the space near the end to \n if you want the result to be on two lines.

Examples:

}; test ;} becomes }; };

};
test
};
becomes }; };

abc };
test
}; def
becomes abc }; }; def

abc }; 111
test1
test2
222 }; def
becomes abc }; }; def

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\};[^}]*KEYWORD[^}]*\};

will work if there are no } between the two delimiters.

So:

sed 's/\};[^}]*KEYWORD[^}]*\};/}; };/g' file.in > file.out
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but this would match the start and end markers as well right? –  Gopi Sep 17 '10 at 8:40
    
Yes, and they are replaced right back. sed doesn't have lookaround (GNU BRE engine). –  Tim Pietzcker Sep 17 '10 at 8:41
    
Just match the whole thing and then replace it with the literal "}; };" –  colithium Sep 17 '10 at 8:41
    
getting some error. "RE error: parentheses not balanced" –  sole007 Sep 17 '10 at 9:11
    
Hm. Does sed 's/\};[^\}]*KEYWORD[^\}]*\};/}; };/g' file.in > file.out work? –  Tim Pietzcker Sep 17 '10 at 9:14

Below regex will match the thing that you want to delete -

(?<=\};).*?KEYWORD.*?(?=\};)

Edit: this wont work with sed as pointed out by @Tim as sed does not support lookarounds.

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This is not looking for the keyword, and won't work in sed (no lookaround). –  Tim Pietzcker Sep 17 '10 at 8:39
    
Thanks @Tim for bringing it to my notice. Fixed. And yeah this is general regex, I am not sure about any specifics with sed. –  Gopi Sep 17 '10 at 8:42

The simplest approach possible:

cat file.in | sed "/KEYWORD/s/};[^}]*};/}; };/g" > file.out
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