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What is the difference between

  1. a parameter passed by reference
  2. a parameter passed by value?

Could you give me some examples, please?

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Related: How to pass objects to functions in C++? –  Roger Pate Nov 11 '10 at 1:48

15 Answers 15

Best explanation I ever heard of this.

Say I want to share a web page with you.

If I tell you the URL, I'm passing by reference. You can use that URL to see the same web page I can see. If that page is changed, we both see the changes. If you delete the URL, all you're doing is destroying your reference to that page - you're not deleting the actual page itself.

If I print out the page and give you the printout, I'm passing by value. Your page is a disconnected copy of the original. You won't see any subsequent changes, and any changes that you make (e.g. scribbling on your printout) will not show up on the original page. If you destroy the printout, you have actually destroyed your copy of the object - but the original web page remains intact.

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13  
I know I am way late to the party but WOW! That was the best explanation I ever heard. I was getting stuck on this for awhile. –  Stanley Williams Jan 19 '12 at 22:44
1  
Nice example sir. But how do you extend this to "passing by pointer"? –  Pouya Jun 13 '12 at 11:22
54  
Passing by pointer is passing by reference - in the example above, the URL is a pointer to the resource. If you're talking about languages like C, where you can have pointers to other pointers... well, that's like me writing the URL on a post-it note, sticking it on the fridge, and telling you to go and look on the fridge - I'm giving you a pointer ("look on the fridge") to a pointer ("www.stackoverflow.com") to the actual thing you want. –  Dylan Beattie Jun 13 '12 at 11:30
7  
+1 Best example ever. –  BlaShadow Apr 24 '13 at 17:02
2  
I wish I had heard that one when I was taking Operating Systems in undergrad. –  Eric Wich Jun 7 '13 at 16:51

It's a way how to pass arguments to functions. Passing by reference means the called functions' parameter will be the same as the callers' passed argument (not the value, but the identity - the variable itself). Pass by value means the called functions' parameter will be a copy of the callers' passed argument. The value will be the same, but the identity - the variable - is different. Thus changes to a parameter done by the called function in one case changes the argument passed and in the other case just changes the value of the parameter in the called function (which is only a copy). In a quick hurry:

  • Java only supports pass by value. Always copies arguments, even though when copying a reference to an object, the parameter in the called function will point to the same object and changes to that object will be see in the caller. Since this can be confusing, here is what Jon Skeet has to say about this.
  • C# supports pass by value and pass by reference (keyword ref used at caller and called function). Jon Skeet also has a nice explanation of this here.
  • C++ supports pass by value and pass by reference (reference parameter type used at called function). You will find an explanation of this below.

Codes

Since my language is C++, i will use that here

// passes a pointer (called reference in java) to an integer
void call_by_value(int *p) { // :1
    p = NULL;
}

// passes an integer
void call_by_value(int p) { // :2
    p = 42;
}

// passes an integer by reference
void call_by_reference(int & p) { // :3
    p = 42;
}

// this is the java style of passing references. NULL is called "null" there.
void call_by_value_special(int *p) { // :4
    *p = 10; // changes what p points to ("what p references" in java)
    // only changes the value of the parameter, but *not* of 
    // the argument passed by the caller. thus it's pass-by-value:
    p = NULL;
}

int main() {
    int value = 10;
    int * pointer = &value;

    call_by_value(pointer); // :1
    assert(pointer == &value); // pointer was copied

    call_by_value(value); // :2
    assert(value == 10); // value was copied

    call_by_reference(value); // :3
    assert(value == 42); // value was passed by reference

    call_by_value_special(pointer); // :4
    // pointer was copied but what pointer references was changed.
    assert(value == 10 && pointer == &value);
}

And an example in Java won't hurt:

class Example {
    int value = 0;

    // similar to :4 case in the c++ example
    static void accept_reference(Example e) { // :1
        e.value++; // will change the referenced object
        e = null; // will only change the parameter
    }

    // similar to the :2 case in the c++ example
    static void accept_primitive(int v) { // :2
        v++; // will only change the parameter
    }        

    public static void main(String... args) {
        int value = 0;
        Example ref = new Example(); // reference

        // note what we pass is the reference, not the object. we can't 
        // pass objects. The reference is copied (pass-by-value).
        accept_reference(ref); // :1
        assert ref != null && ref.value == 1;

        // the primitive int variable is copied
        accept_primitive(value); // :2
        assert value == 0;
    }
}

Wikipedia

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pass_by_reference#Call_by_value

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pass_by_reference#Call_by_reference

This guy pretty much nails it:

http://javadude.com/articles/passbyvalue.htm

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1  
why the downvote? if anything is wrong or leads to misunderstandings please leave a comment. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Dec 17 '08 at 2:11
    
Wasn't my vote, but on a minor point (you know, the kind taken up in the presidential debates) I'd say it's more of a "tactic" than a "strategy." –  harpo Dec 17 '08 at 2:19
7  
+1 for Completeness. Don't worry about downvotes - people do it for weird reasons. In an opinion question about calculators everyone was downvoted by a guy who didn't think programmers should use calculators! Anyway, I thought your answer was very good. –  Mark Brittingham Jan 10 '09 at 13:47

Here is an example:

#include <iostream>

void by_val(int arg) { arg += 2; }
void by_ref(int&arg) { arg += 2; }

int main()
{
    int x = 0;
    by_val(x); std::cout << x << std::endl;  // prints 0
    by_ref(x); std::cout << x << std::endl;  // prints 2

    int y = 0;
    by_ref(y); std::cout << y << std::endl;  // prints 2
    by_val(y); std::cout << y << std::endl;  // prints 2
}
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4  
+1 for using C++ to explain :) –  Perpetualcoder Dec 17 '08 at 5:11
    
Oh, no, I have used C++! What a fool I was! –  Eduardo León Nov 17 '12 at 8:19
    
I think there is one problem as last line should print 0 instead of 2. Kindly tell me if I'm missing something. –  Taimoor Changaiz Mar 11 at 17:43
    
@TaimoorChangaiz; Which "last line"? By the way, if you can use IRC, please come to ##programming on Freenode. It would be a lot easier to explain things there. My nick there is "pyon". –  Eduardo León Mar 11 at 17:57
    
@EduardoLeón by_val(y); std::cout << y << std::endl; // prints 2 –  Taimoor Changaiz Mar 12 at 12:18

When do we pass arguments by reference or pointer?

1) To modify local variables of the caller function: A reference (or pointer) allows called function to modify a local variable of the caller function. For example, consider the following example program where fun() is able to modify local variable x of main().

void fun(int &x) {
    x = 20;
}

int main() {
    int x = 10;
    fun(x);
    cout<<"New value of x is "<<x;
    return 0;
}

Output: New value of x is 20


2) For passing large sized arguments: If an argument is large, passing by reference (or pointer) is more efficient because only an address is really passed, not the entire object. For example, let us consider the following Employee class and a function printEmpDetails() that prints Employee details.

class Employee {
private:
    string name;
    string desig;

    // More attributes and operations
};

void printEmpDetails(Employee emp) {
     cout<<emp.getName();
     cout<<emp.getDesig();

    // Print more attributes
}

The problem with above code is: every time printEmpDetails() is called, a new Employee abject is constructed that involves creating a copy of all data members. So a better implementation would be to pass Employee as a reference.

void printEmpDetails(const Employee &emp) {
     cout<<emp.getName();
     cout<<emp.getDesig();

    // Print more attributes 
}

This point is valid only for struct and class variables as we don’t get any efficiency advantage for basic types like int, char.. etc.


3) To avoid Object Slicing: If we pass an object of subclass to a function that expects an object of superclass then the passed object is sliced if it is pass by value. For example, consider the following program, it prints “This is Pet Class”.

#include <iostream>
#include<string>

using namespace std;

class Pet {
public:
    virtual string getDescription() const {
        return "This is Pet class";
    }
};

class Dog : public Pet {
public:
    virtual string getDescription() const {
        return "This is Dog class";
    }
};

void describe(Pet p) { // Slices the derived class object
    cout<<p.getDescription()<<endl;
}

int main() {
    Dog d;
    describe(d);
    return 0;
}

Output: This is Pet Class

If we use pass by reference in the above program then it correctly prints “This is Dog Class”. See the following modified program.

#include <iostream>
#include<string>

using namespace std;

class Pet {
public:
    virtual string getDescription() const {
        return "This is Pet class";
    }
};

class Dog : public Pet {
public:
    virtual string getDescription() const {
        return "This is Dog class";
    }
};

void describe(const Pet &p) { // Doesn't slice the derived class object.
    cout<<p.getDescription()<<endl;
}

int main() {
    Dog d;
    describe(d);
    return 0;
}

Output: This is Dog Class

This point is also not valid for basic data types like int, char, .. etc.


4) To achieve Run Time Polymorphism in a function We can make a function polymorphic by passing objects as reference (or pointer) to it. For example, in the following program, print() receives a reference to the base class object. print() calls the base class function show() if base class object is passed, and derived class function show() if derived class object is passed.

#include<iostream>
using namespace std;

class base {
public:
    virtual void show() {  // Note the virtual keyword here
        cout<<"In base \n";
    }
};


class derived: public base {
public:
    void show() {
        cout<<"In derived \n";
    }
};

// Since we pass b as reference, we achieve run time polymorphism here.
void print(base &b) {
    b.show();
}

int main(void) {
    base b;
    derived d;
    print(b);
    print(d);
    return 0;
}

Output: In base
In derived

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When passing by ref you are basically passing a pointer to the variable. Pass by value you are passing a copy of the variable. In basic usage this normally means pass by ref changes to the variable will seen be the calling method and pass by value they wont.

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Pass by value sends a COPY of the data stored in the variable you specify, pass by reference sends a direct link to the variable itself. So if you pass a variable by reference and then change the variable inside the block you passed it into, the original variable will be changed. If you simply pass by value, the original variable will not be able to be changed by the block you passed it into but you will get a copy of whatever it contained at the time of the call.

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A major difference between them is that value-type variables store values, so specifying a value-type variable in a method call passes a copy of that variable's value to the method. Reference-type variables store references to objects, so specifying a reference-type variable as an argument passes the method a copy of the actual reference that refers to the object. Even though the reference itself is passed by value, the method can still use the reference it receives to interact with—and possibly modify—the original object. Similarly, when returning information from a method via a return statement, the method returns a copy of the value stored in a value-type variable or a copy of the reference stored in a reference-type variable. When a reference is returned, the calling method can use that reference to interact with the referenced object. So, in effect, objects are always passed by reference.

In c#, to pass a variable by reference so the called method can modify the variable's, C# provides keywords ref and out. Applying the ref keyword to a parameter declaration allows you to pass a variable to a method by reference—the called method will be able to modify the original variable in the caller. The ref keyword is used for variables that already have been initialized in the calling method. Normally, when a method call contains an uninitialized variable as an argument, the compiler generates an error. Preceding a parameter with keyword out creates an output parameter. This indicates to the compiler that the argument will be passed into the called method by reference and that the called method will assign a value to the original variable in the caller. If the method does not assign a value to the output parameter in every possible path of execution, the compiler generates an error. This also prevents the compiler from generating an error message for an uninitialized variable that is passed as an argument to a method. A method can return only one value to its caller via a return statement, but can return many values by specifying multiple output (ref and/or out) parameters.

see c# discussion and examples here link text

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Comparing: Value vs. Reference

Pass By Value The local parameters are copies of the original arguments passed in Changes made in the function to these variables do not affect originals

Pass By Reference The local parameters are references to the storage locations of the original arguments passed in. Changes to these variables in the function will affect the originals No copy is made, so overhead of copying (time, storage) is saved

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In short, Passed by value is WHAT it is and passed by reference is WHERE it is.

If your value is VAR1 = "Happy Guy!", you will only see "Happy Guy!". If VAR1 changes to "Happy Gal!", you won't know that. If it's passed by reference, and VAR1 changes, you will.

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The simplest way to get this is on an Excel file. Let’s say for example that you have two numbers, 5 and 2 in cells A1 and B1 accordingly, and you want to find their sum in a third cell, let's say A2. You can do this in two ways.

  • Either by passing their values to cell A2 by typing = 5 + 2 into this cell. In this case, if the values of the cells A1 or B1 change, the sum in A2 remains the same.

  • Or by passing the “references” of the cells A1 and B1 to cell A2 by typing = A1 + B1. In this case, if the values of the cells A1 or B1 change, the sum in A2 changes too.

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By definition, pass by value means you are making a copy in memory of the actual parameter's value that is passed in, a copy of the contents of the actual parameter. Use pass by value when when you are only "using" the parameter for some computation, not changing it for the client program.

In pass by reference (also called pass by address), a copy of the address of the actual parameter is stored. Use pass by reference when you are changing the parameter passed in by the client program.

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pass by value means how to pass value to a function by making use of arguments. in pass by value we copy the data stored in the variable we specify and it is slower than pass by reference bcse t he data is copied . of we make changes in the copied data the original data is not affected. nd in pass by refernce or pass by address we send direct link to the variable itself . or passing pointer to a variable. it is faster bcse less time is consumed

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pass by value means you are making a copy in memory of the actual parameter's value that is passed in, a copy of the contents of the actual parameter. Use pass by value when when you are only "using" the parameter for some computation, not changing it for the client program.

In pass by reference (also called pass by address), a copy of the address of the actual parameter is stored. Use pass by reference when you are changing the parameter passed in by the client program.

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If you don't want to change the value of the original variable after passing it into a function, the function should be constructed with a "pass by value" parameter.

Then the function will have ONLY the value but not the address of the passed in variable. Without the variable's address, the code inside the function cannot change the variable value as seen from the outside of the function.

But if you want to give the function the *ability to change the value of the variabl*e as seen from the outside, you need to use pass by reference. As both the value and the address (reference) are passed in and available inside the function.

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Examples:

class Dog 
{ 
public:
    barkAt( const std::string& pOtherDog ); // const reference
    barkAt( std::string pOtherDog ); // value
};

const & is generally best. You don't incur the construction and destruction penalty. If the reference isn't const your interface is suggesting that it will change the passed in data.

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