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I have this piece of javascript code that I am trying to understand

return ( n >>> 0 ) * 2.34e10;

So what does >>> mean?

And thanks in advance ... this is my first question on SO

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2 Answers 2

up vote 17 down vote accepted

It's a zero-fill right shift. This won't do anything to positive whole numbers or 0, but it does funny things on negative numbers (because the most significant bit changes to zero).

 2 >>> 0 === 2
 1 >>> 0 === 1
 0 >>> 0 === 0
-1 >>> 0 === 4294967295
-2 >>> 0 === 4294967294
-3 >>> 0 === 4294967293

It should be noted (thanks Andy!) that bit shifting in JavaScript converts the arguments to signed 32-bit integers before doing the shifting. Therefore >>> 0 essentially does a Math.floor on positive numbers:

1.1 >>> 0 === 1
1.9 >>> 0 === 1
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I wanted to +1, but I felt compelled to perform a minor edit first ;-) You could also expand on what it will do to positive floats, if you wanted to :-) –  Andy E Sep 17 '10 at 10:37
1  
@Andy Very appreciated, and good point. –  Skilldrick Sep 17 '10 at 10:37
    
Brilliant!!... Thanks a lot Skilldrick, Andy E and acqu13sce. Thanks also for the references. –  var x Sep 17 '10 at 10:58
1  
This operation is actually the only bitwise operation in JavaScript that is unsigned –  Joe Dec 15 '11 at 22:33
    
>>> is unsigned right shift, >> is signed right shift. The former converts the RHS using ToUint32, which does what it's called. –  gsnedders Dec 15 '11 at 22:34

It's a bitwise operator. It means shift n by 0 bits. Not sure what it's trying to do in the instance you show.

a >>> b  // shift a by b bits to the right, padding with zeros
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(a >>> 0) is used to coerce a to a 32 bit unsigned integer. –  Mike Samuel Dec 15 '11 at 22:27

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