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If I create a class like so:

// B.h
#ifndef _B_H_
#define _B_H_

class B
{
private:
    int x;
    int y;
};

#endif // _B_H_

and use it like this:

// main.cpp
#include <iostream>
#include <vector>

class B; // Forward declaration.

class A
{
public:
    A() {
        std::cout << v.size() << std::endl;
    }

private:
    std::vector<B> v;
};

int main()
{
    A a;
}

The compiler fails when compiling main.cpp. Now the solution I know is to #include "B.h", but I'm curious as to why it fails. Neither g++ or cl's error messages were very enlightening in this matter.

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Note you can pass a vector<T> into a function with only forward declared type T if you pass it as a vector<T>& (but not vector<T> because that would require a copy operation) –  bobobobo Jul 26 '13 at 18:01

7 Answers 7

up vote 22 down vote accepted

The compiler needs to know how big "B" is before it can generate the appropriate layout information. If instead, you said std::vector<B*>, then the compiler wouldn't need to know how big B is because it knows how big a pointer is.

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But as I know, std::vector<B> v should only contain a pointer to B*, which should be of the same effect as defining: B* here –  Baiyan Huang Mar 25 '11 at 13:42
    
It's not just a pointer to B -- at a minimum, it needs to create an array of B to store into that pointer. And to create the array, you need to know the size of B. –  Curt Hagenlocher Apr 25 '11 at 1:52
3  
@lzprgmr: Indeed, vector<T> probably only contains a pointer to T, so I disagree with Curt's answer. The layout of vector<B> can be known without knowing the definition of B, but since vector is a template, all its member functions must be instantiated for each template argument: you can't separate their declarations from their implementations. Since some of these member functions will need T's definition, it must be a complete type to be used in a vector. The issue is due to member functions being defined inline, not to vector<B>'s layout depending on B's layout. –  Luc Touraille Nov 18 '11 at 14:30

To instantiate A::v, the compiler needs to know the concrete type of B.

If you're trying to minimize the amount of #included baggage to improve compile times, there are two things you can do, which are really variations of each other:

  1. Use a pointer to B
  2. Use a lightweight proxy to B
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It's more than just the size of B that's needed. Modern compilers will have fancy tricks to speed up vector copies using memcpy where possible, for instance. This is commonly achieved by partially specializing on the POD-ness of the element type. You can't tell if B is a POD from a forward declaration.

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This doesn't matter whether you use a vector or just try to instantiate one B. Instantiation requires the full definition of an object.

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In fact your example would build if A's constructor were implemented in a compile unit that knows the type of B.

An std::vector instance has a fixed size, no matter what T is, since it contains, as others said before, only a pointer to T. But the vector's constructor depends on the concrete type. Your example doesn't compile because A() tries to call the vector's ctor, which can't be generated without knowing B. Here's what would work:

A's declaration:

// A.h
#include <vector>

class B; // Forward declaration.

class A
{
public:
    A(); // only declare, don't implement here

private:
    std::vector<B> v;
};

A's implementation:

// A.cpp
#include "A.h"
#include "B.h"

A::A() // this implicitly calls vector<B>'s constructor
{
    std::cout << v.size() << std::endl;
}

Now a user of A needs to know only A, not B:

// main.cpp
#include "A.h"

int main()
{
    A a; // compiles OK
}
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Man, your instancing std::vector with an incomplete type, dont touch the forward declaration, just move the constructor definition to cpp file.

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The reason you can't use a forward declaration is because the size of B is unknown.

There's no reason in your example that you can't include B.h inside of A.h, so what problem are you really trying to solve?

Edit: There's another way to solve this problem, too: stop using C/C++! It's so 1970s... ;)

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2  
'stop using C/C++' doesn't appear to be a solution to the original problem. patient: "doctor, it hurts when i do this", doctor: "well, then don't do that!" Is there another language or tool that can interoperate well with C++ that you would suggest instead? –  Aaron Sep 17 '08 at 17:31

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