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I am having writing an algorithm to generate all possible permutations of an array of this kind:

n = length
k = number of 1's in array

So this means if we have k 1's we will have n-k 0's in the array.

For example: n = 5; k = 3;

So obviously there are 5 choose 3 possible permutations for this array because
n!/(k!(n-k)!
5!/(3!2!) = (5*4)/2 = 10
possible values for the array

Here are all the values:
11100
11010
11001
10110
10101
10011
01110
01101
01011
00111

I am guessing i should use a recursive algorithms but i am just not seeing it. I am writing this algorithm in C++.

Any help would be appreciated!

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Is this homework? –  Péter Török Sep 17 '10 at 12:14
    
See related question: stackoverflow.com/questions/3437205/c-0-1-permutations/… –  NullUserException Sep 17 '10 at 12:15
    
no, this is not homework oh and yes it is a combination not permutation... –  gprime Sep 17 '10 at 12:38
    
Have you checked the FAQ:stackoverflow.com/tags/algorithm/faq? –  Aryabhatta Sep 17 '10 at 16:27
    
possible duplicate of Algorithm to return all combinations of k elements from n –  Aryabhatta Sep 17 '10 at 16:27
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7 Answers 7

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You can split up the combinations into those starting with 1 (n-1, k-1) and those starting with 0 (n-1, k).

This is essentially the recursive formula for the choose function.

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Just start with 00111 and then use std::next_permutation to generate the rest:

#include <algorithm>
#include <iostream>
#include <string>

int main()
{
    std::string s = "00111";
    do
    {
        std::cout << s << '\n';
    }
    while (std::next_permutation(s.begin(), s.end()));
}

output:

00111
01011
01101
01110
10011
10101
10110
11001
11010
11100
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If he needs to implement the algorithem, as I understand the OP, this wont help. –  InsertNickHere Sep 17 '10 at 12:20
    
@Insert: Oh, is this a homework question? –  FredOverflow Sep 17 '10 at 12:21
3  
Why the *#%& was this downvoted?! –  Konrad Rudolph Sep 17 '10 at 13:03
4  
OP says it's not homework so standard libs should be encouraged, not downvoted. –  Mark Peters Sep 17 '10 at 13:08
    
dident downvote. Did saw his comment too late that its not hw. –  InsertNickHere Sep 18 '10 at 8:02
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What you want is actually a combination since the 1's and 0's are indistinguishable and therefore their order doesn't matter (e.g. 1 1 1 vs 1 1 1).

I recently had to rewrite a combination function myself because my initial version was written recursively in a very straightforward way (pick an element, get all the combinations of the remaining array, insert the element in various places) and did not perform very well.

I searched StackOverflow and just seeing the pictures in this answer lit up the iconic lightbulb over my head.

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It's not actually a combination either, is it? Since the 1s and 0s are distinguished from each other. 111000 != 010101 but those would be considered the same combination. –  Mark Peters Sep 17 '10 at 13:14
    
Oh, I see how it's a combination. It would be choose k from {1, 2, 3, 4, ... n} which would be the indices of the 1s in the resultant combination. –  Mark Peters Sep 17 '10 at 13:15
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If you want to do this recursively, observe that the set of permutations you want is equal to all the ones that start with "1", together with all the ones that start with "0". So in calculating (n,k), you will recurse on (n-1,k-1) and (n-1,k), with special cases where k = 0 and k = n.

This recursion is the reason that the binomial coefficients appear as the values in Pascal's triangle.

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Homework and recursive algorithm? OK, here you go:

Base case: You have two elements, name them "a" and "b" and produce the concatenations ab, then ba.

Step: If your second Element is longer than 1, split it up in first field/letter and the other part, and pass that recursively as parameters to the function itself.

That will work for any strings and arrays.

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Its about 0-1 permutations, so probably its much more eficient to iteratively increment an integer and in case it has desired bits count, print out its binary representation.

Here a sketch:

void printAllBinaryPermutations(int k, int n)  
{  
  int max = pow(2, n) - 1;  
  for(int i=0; i<=max;i++)  
  {  
    if(hasBitCountOf(i, k)) // i has k 1's?  
    {  
      printAsBinary(i, n);  
    }  
  }  
}  


bool hasBitCountOf(int v, int expectedBitCount)  
{  
    int count = 0;  
    while(v>0 && count<= expectedBitCount)  
    {  
        int half = v >> 1;  
        if(half<<1 != v)  
        {  
            // v is odd  
            count++;  
        }  
        v = half;  
    }  

    return count==expectedBitCount;  
}  


void printAsBinary(int number, int strLen)  
{  
  for(int i=strLen-1; i>=0; i--)  
  {  
    bool is0 = (number & pow(2,i)) == 0;  
    if (is0)  
    {  
      cout<<'0';  
    }  
    else  
    {  
      cout<<'1';  
    }  
  }   

  cout<<endl;  

}
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even though i am iterating over much more combinations than actually are generated, this solution should be more efficient as this is simple bit shifting and incrementing, and no stack blowing recursion. –  Adesit Sep 17 '10 at 13:38
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I am not sure this helps, plus it is just some weird pseudocode, but this should give you the desired ouput.

permutation (prefix, ones, zeros, cur) {
    if (ones + zeros == 0) output(cur);
    else {
        if (cur != -1) prefix = concat(prefix,cur);
        if (ones > 0) permutation(prefix, ones - 1, zeros, 1);
        if (zeros > 0) permutation(prefix, ones, zeros - 1, 0);
    }        
}

permutation(empty, 3, 2, -1);

greetz
back2dos

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