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Is it possible?

template<operator Op> int Calc(int a, b)
{ return a Op b; }

int main()
{ cout << Calc<+>(5,3); }

If not, is way to achieve this without ifs and switches?

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(int a, b) -> (int a, int b). informit.com/guides/content.aspx?g=cplusplus&seqNum=141 –  DumbCoder Sep 17 '10 at 12:49

3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted

You could use functors for this:

template<typename Op> int Calc(int a, int b)
{
    Op o;
    return o(a, b);
}

Calc<std::plus<int>>(5, 3);
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It should be the way to go. Thanks a lot. –  Xirdus Sep 17 '10 at 12:56
3  
@xir: Note that passing it as a function argument instead of as a template argument like Dario shows gives the user more freedom, e.g. to pass stateful functors, bind() expressions, ... –  Georg Fritzsche Sep 17 '10 at 13:02
    
Could just be return Op()(a, b);, but like Georg says it's more flexible if you accept it as a parameter. –  GManNickG Sep 17 '10 at 14:43
    
This is the first thing that came to my mind :) –  Nikola Smiljanić Sep 17 '10 at 14:46

No - templates are about types or primitive values.

You can nontheless pass so called function objects that can be called like functions and carry the desired operator functionality (despite having a nice syntax).

The standard library defines several ones, e.g. std::plus for addition ...

#include <functional>

template<typename Op>
int Calc(int a, int b, Op f) { 
  return f(a, b);
}

int main() { 
  cout << Calc(5,3, std::plus());
  cout << Calc(5,3, std::minus());
}
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You can do this using polymorphism:

#include <cstdlib>
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;


class Operator
{
public:
    virtual int operator()(int a, int b) const = 0;
};

class Add : public Operator
{
public:
    int operator()(int a, int b) const
    {
        return a+b;
    }
};

class Sub : public Operator
{
public:
    int operator()(int a, int b) const
    {
        return a-b;
    }
};

class Mul : public Operator
{
public:
    int operator()(int a, int b) const
    {
        return a*b;
    }
};


int main()
{
    Add adder;
    cout << adder(1,2) << endl;
    Sub suber;
    cout << suber(1,2) << endl;
    Mul muler;
    cout << muler(1,2) << endl;
    return 0;
}
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Correct. But to show this is really useful, you'll have to actually use the runtime polymorphism and use an Operator& interface. Implement Calc for that matter. Nontheless +1 in advance! –  Dario Sep 17 '10 at 13:41

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