Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a sparse array, for example:

rare = [[0,1], [2,3], [4,5], [7,8]]

I want to plot a chart with these data, each pair are point coordinates. As you can see I don't have points for x=1, x=3 , x=5, x=6

I want to fill the array with the previous values, so for the above example I will get:

filled = [[0,1], [1,1], [2,3], [3,3], [4,5], [5,5], [6,5], [7,8]

As you can see, for calculating the y value, I simply take the last y value I used.

What is the best aproach to accomplish this ?

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted
Range.new(*rare.transpose.first.sort.values_at(0,-1)).inject([]){|a,i|
  a<<[i, Hash[rare][i] || a.last.last]
}

Step-by-step explanation:

  1. rare.transpose.first.sort.values_at(0,-1) finds min and max x ([0,7] in your example)
  2. Range.new() makes a range out of it (0..7)
  3. inject iterates through the range and for every x returns pair [x,y], where y is:
    1. y from input array, where defined
    2. y from previously evaluated pair, where not

Note: here are some other ways of finding min and max x:

[:min,:max].map{|m| Hash[rare].keys.send m}
rare.map{|el| el.first}.minmax # Ruby 1.9, by steenslag
share|improve this answer
    
Care to talk us through that one? I assume it'll work but it's not particularly readable :) –  Glenjamin Sep 17 '10 at 14:48
    
It fails for empty "rare". I'd say that using << with inject is kind of cheating, but it will be definitely faster. –  tokland Sep 17 '10 at 14:51
    
@Glenjamin: I gave my best :) @tokland: Thanks for the bug report, and why do you think << with inject is cheating? Cheating could be using inject where map is logical (as I am mapping an array to another), but I needed previous values, therefore inject. –  Mladen Jablanović Sep 17 '10 at 15:01
    
@mladen: it should read "cheating", it was a pedantic note ;-) as you know "inject" is the Ruby's name for the standard FP fold/reduce/... function, and in FP you don't modify objects in-place. Of course in Ruby we do it all the time, so it's not a big deal. To be purely functional: a + [[i, Hash[rare][i] || a.last.last]]. –  tokland Sep 17 '10 at 15:18
    
In ruby 1.9 step 1 can be replaced with: rare.map{|el| el.first}.minmax –  steenslag Sep 17 '10 at 16:47
rare = [[0,1], [2,3], [4,5], [7,8]]

filled = rare.inject([]) do |filled, point|
  extras = if filled.empty?
             []
           else
             (filled.last[0] + 1 ... point[0]).collect do |x|
               [x, filled.last[1]]
             end
           end
  filled + extras + [point]
end

p filled
# => [[0, 1], [1, 1], [2, 3], [3, 3], [4, 5], [5, 5], [6, 5], [7, 8]]
share|improve this answer
    
note to @astropanic, my solution and Wayne's are virtually the same (only his was 4 mins faster). –  tokland Sep 17 '10 at 14:25
    
@tokland, :) I'd get out of my mind if I were you. Take it from me: It's scary in here! –  Wayne Conrad Sep 17 '10 at 15:20

An inject solution:

filled = rare.inject([]) do |filled_acc, (pair_x, pair_y)|
  padded_pairs = unless filled_acc.empty?    
    last_x, last_y = filled_acc.last
    (last_x+1...pair_x).map { |x| [x, last_y] }
  end || []
  filled_acc + padded_pairs + [[pair_x, pair_y]] 
end

More about Enumerable#inject and functional programming with Ruby here.

share|improve this answer
irb(main):001:0> rare = [[0,1], [2,3], [4,5], [7,8]]
=> [[0, 1], [2, 3], [4, 5], [7, 8]]
irb(main):002:0> r=rare.transpose
=> [[0, 2, 4, 7], [1, 3, 5, 8]]
irb(main):003:0> iv = (r[0][0]..r[0][-1]).to_a.select {|w| !r[0].include?(w) }
=> [1, 3, 5, 6]
irb(main):004:0> r[1][-1]=r[1][-2]
=> 5
irb(main):005:0> p (iv.zip(r[1]) + rare).sort
[[0, 1], [1, 1], [2, 3], [3, 3], [4, 5], [5, 5], [6, 5], [7, 8]]
=> [[0, 1], [1, 1], [2, 3], [3, 3], [4, 5], [5, 5], [6, 5], [7, 8]]
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.