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Below is my code for a File watcher class I wrote:

class FileWatcher  
{  
    #region Method that begins watching  
    public static void watch()  
    {

        FileSystemWatcher watcher = new FileSystemWatcher();

        watcher.Path = ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["OpticusFileLoc"];
        watcher.Filter = ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["OpticusFileName"];

        watcher.NotifyFilter = NotifyFilters.LastAccess | NotifyFilters.LastWrite | NotifyFilters.FileName | NotifyFilters.DirectoryName;

        watcher.Changed += new FileSystemEventHandler(OnChanged);
        Console.Write("\nWatcher started. Press any key to end.\n");

        watcher.EnableRaisingEvents = true;
    }
    #endregion

    #region Trigger function on change
    public static void OnChanged(object source, FileSystemEventArgs e)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("File has been changed.\n");
        //watcher.EnableRaisingEvents = false ;

        //Program.Main();
    }
    #endregion

}

How can I, from the OnChanged method, set the watcher.EnableRaisingEvents flag to false?

I guess I could do it by moving the declaration of the FileSystemWatcher object outside the method it is in, but I'm wondering if there's another way to do it.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I guess I could do it by moving the declaration of the FileSystemWatcher object outside the method it is in, but I'm wondering if there's another way to do it.

That's exactly how you should do it (have watcher just be a member field of your FileWatcher class).

That said, you also could do it like this:

public static void OnChanged(object source, FileSystemEventArgs e)
{
    Console.WriteLine("File has been changed.");

    var watcher = source as FileSystemWatcher;
    if (watcher != null)
    {
        watcher.EnableRaisingEvents = false;
    }
    else
    {
        // Hmm... some other object called this method.
        // Do you really want that to be allowed?
    }
}

Notice the comment I added in the code above. Generally it's a bad call to make methods such as this public, as this makes it possible for any arbitrary code to call OnChanged even when doing so makes no sense. (You want for this method to capture the event of a file being changed; if it's actually callable from anywhere, then how do you know if the file was in fact changed or if this is just some random call from elsewhere?)

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While your second solution works and I am tempted to implement it, why do you strongly recommend to move the FileSystemWatcher object outside the method? –  xbonez Sep 17 '10 at 16:07
    
But I could still implement your second solution and make OnChanged a private method, couldn't I? Any reason I should not do it that way? –  xbonez Sep 17 '10 at 16:10
    
@xbonez: Mainly just because the FileSystemWatcher object itself is logically a component of your FileWatcher class, so having it as a member field makes it much more straightforward to interact with it directly. What do you gain by not assigning it to a field? If you introduce any other code to your class that you want to interact with the watcher, it's going to become impossible to do so without maintaining a reference to it. –  Dan Tao Sep 17 '10 at 16:12
    
Gotcha. That does make sense. Should I later add another method that needs to access it, it will need to be outside all methods. Thanks for the explanation. There isn't any reason for me to not move it out. I was just curious, thats all. –  xbonez Sep 17 '10 at 16:15
    
@xbonez: Yeah, like for example you might want to have some code in your FileWatcher class that's capable of suspending the watcher, or changing its filter. When watcher is only a local variable within your watch method, it can't be accessed anywhere else. The fact that you can get to it from within OnChanged is just a convenient byproduct of the fact that objects pass themselves when they raise events. This is behavior that is specific to events and should not be treated as a general way to "get around" the lack of a member field referencing an object that you need access to. –  Dan Tao Sep 17 '10 at 16:19

source is probably the FileSystemWatcher in question, so try this:

((FileSystemWatcher)source).EnableChangingEvents = false;
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The object source parameter should be your FileSystemWatcher object, so you could just use that to shut it down.

public static void OnChanged(object source, FileSystemEventArgs e)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("File has been changed.\n");
        (source as FileSystemWatcher).EnableRaisingEvents = false;
    }
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Is this the kind of thing you want to do?

public static void OnChanged(object source, FileSystemEventArgs e)
{
   FileSystemWatcher watcher = (FileSystemWatcher)source;
   watcher.EnableRaisingEvents = false ;
}
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