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An example of what I'm talking about:

class Person < ActiveRecord::Base
  def name=(name)
    super(name.capitalize)
  end
  def name
    super().downcase  # not sure why you'd do this; this is just an example
  end
end

This seems to work, but I was just read the section on overriding attribute methods in the ActiveRecord::Base docs, and it suggests using the read_attribute and write_attribute methods. I thought there must be something wrong with what I'm doing in the example above; otherwise, why would they bless these methods as the "right way" to override attribute methods? They're also forcing a much uglier idiom, so there must be a good reason...

My real question: Is there something wrong with this example?

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5 Answers 5

Echoing Gareth's comments... your code will not work as written. It should be rewritten this way:

def name=(name)
  write_attribute(:name, name.capitalize)
end

def name
  read_attribute(:name).downcase  # No test for nil?
end
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Exactly what I needed. Thanks Aaron. –  bong Jan 13 '11 at 22:34
11  
This is no longer true. Either super or this works now. I've not tested the hash notation, however. –  tehgeekmeister Apr 21 '11 at 17:32
2  
In rails 3, the reader method specified here by Aaron works, but the writer that the original poster specified (feeding the name to super) works fine, and IMHO is cleaner than manually writing the attribute as Aaron suggests. –  Batkins Nov 23 '11 at 20:46
1  
I have tested the hash method given by mipadi below and it works like a charm (Rails v 3.2.6) –  almathie Jul 23 '12 at 10:45
    
it works perfectly –  channa ly Sep 27 '12 at 4:50

As an extension to Aaron Longwell's answer, you can also use a "hash notation" to access attributes that have overridden accessors and mutators:

def name=(name)
  self[:name] = name.capitalize
end

def name
  self[:name].downcase
end
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Hash notation may work, but self.attribute blows the stack on 3.2.16. –  jrhorn424 May 23 at 23:48

There is some great information available on this topic at http://errtheblog.com/posts/18-accessor-missing.

The long and short of it is that ActiveRecord does correctly handle super calls for ActiveRecord attribute accessors.

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My real question: Is there something wrong with this example?

Yes

Your model's attribute methods are created dynamically on the Person class, they aren't defined on ActiveRecord::Base. For that reason, your super call won't work and will fail.

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14  
Actually, that's not true. According to this, errtheblog.com/posts/18-accessor-missing, "All told, attribute accessor methods are indeed method_missing magic. Get pumped: super will work when overriding them". –  jcnnghm Jan 22 '10 at 15:31

I have a rails plugin that makes attribute overriding work with super as you would expect. You can find it on github.

To install:

./script/plugin install git://github.com/chriseppstein/has_overrides.git

To use:

class Post < ActiveRecord::Base

  has_overrides

  module Overrides
    # put your getter and setter overrides in this module.
    def title=(t)
      super(t.titleize)
    end
  end
end

Once you've done that things just work:

$ ./script/console 
Loading development environment (Rails 2.3.2)
>> post = Post.new(:title => "a simple title")
=> #<Post id: nil, title: "A Simple Title", body: nil, created_at: nil, updated_at: nil>
>> post.title = "another simple title"
=> "another simple title"
>> post.title
=> "Another Simple Title"
>> post.update_attributes(:title => "updated title")
=> true
>> post.title
=> "Updated Title"
>> post.update_attribute(:title, "singly updated title")
=> true
>> post.title
=> "Singly Updated Title"
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3  
This is already built in to rails –  ramn Aug 7 '11 at 14:15

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