Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

i use the following code to communicate with a REST service:

[ServiceContract()]
interface ISomeService
{
    [OperationContract()]
    [WebGet()]
    bool DoSomething();
}

WebHttpBinding binding = new WebHttpBinding();
ChannelFactory<ISomeService> channelFactory = new ChannelFactory<ISomeService>(binding, "http://localhost:12000");
channelFactory.Endpoint.Behaviors.Add(new WebHttpBehavior());
ISomeService service = channelFactory.CreateChannel();
service.DoSomething();

It works fine in simple test applications, but in my real application i want to call it inside my own REST service: If a call to my REST service is made, my service should make a call to another REST service.

And there things go weird. In this situation the code above does not work because if it is placed inside a service method it sends a POST request instead of a GET request, which of course results in a "Method not allowed" error. I don't have the attribute WebInvoke anywhere in my code.

[ServiceContract()]
class MainService
{
    [OperationContract()]
    [WebGet()]
    public void Test()
    {
        CallDoSomething(); // code from above: Sends POST instead of GET request
    }
}

How can it be that the HTTP request method changes?

share|improve this question
    
Dors ISomeService have [WebGet] on its operations? On the client side. –  John Saunders Sep 17 '10 at 17:56
    
Yep, it has [WebGet] on both sides :) I added a demo to the start post. –  pdb Sep 17 '10 at 18:15

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Ah great I found the answer on stackoverflow. :)

http://stackoverflow.com/questions/3294766/wcf-proxy-using-post-even-though-webget-attribute-is-specified-only-when-called

using (new OperationContextScope(service as IContextChannel))
{
    service.DoSomething();
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.