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How do I represent the SQL "not exists" clause in relational algebra?

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2 Answers 2

I think you're looking for the existential quantifier (∃), which you could then negate (~∃).

Response to comment: I don't remember most of my relational algebra, but if I was going to take a stab at it I would guess something along the lines of: σ∃σ(Y)(S). Or possibly π∃π(Y)(S); I don't quite remember if you'd want selection or projection for that.

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if there is query like select * from S where exists(select * from Y); how can i write that in relational algebra –  sudh Sep 17 '10 at 20:22
    
@sudh: The comment section can't accurately display my response, so see the addendum to my answer. –  eldarerathis Sep 17 '10 at 20:47
    
I'm 99% sure the existential quantifier is not part of relational algebra....It doesn't show up anywhere on the RA wikipedia page, also I have not seen it in my textbook, or in lectures. –  Ethan Feb 26 '13 at 23:48
1  
The existential quantifier, is part of relational algebra. It is in my textbook: Databases Systems by Ramez Elmasri (Global Edition, 6th edition, p.173). I think it is easier however to rewrite your query to get rid of the EXISTS operation altogether. (See my answer for that). –  Ewoud Mar 7 '13 at 12:03

In my case I solved this issue by rewriting the query,

SELECT *
FROM contactperson
WHERE EXISTS(
   SELECT *
   FROM person
   WHERE contactperson.personId = person.id)

to:

SELECT *
FROM contactperson
WHERE personId = (
   SELECT id
   FROM person
   WHERE contactperson.personId = person.id)

It returns the same result and is easier to rewrite to relational algebra using a join.

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