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$variable = 'Afrikaans 
Shqip - Albanian  
Euskara - Basque';

How do I convert each new line to paragraph?

$variable should become:

<p>Afrikaans</p>
<p>Shqip - Albanian</p>
<p>Euskara - Basque</p>
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5 Answers 5

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Try this:

$variable = str_replace("\n", "</p>\n<p>", '<p>'.$variable.'</p>');
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2  
+1 for keeping line breaks. It's hard as hell to read HTML source without it –  Your Common Sense Sep 17 '10 at 19:14

The following should do the trick :

$variable = '<p>' . str_replace("\n", "</p><p>", $variable) . '</p>';
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$array = explode("\n", $variable);
$newVariable = '<p>'.implode('</p><p>', $array).'</p>'
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<?php
$variable = 'Afrikaans  
Shqip - Albanian   
Euskara - Basque'; 
$prep0 = str_replace(array("\r\n" , "\n\r") , "\n" , $variable);
$prep1 = str_replace("\r" , "\n" , $prep0);
$prep2 = preg_replace(array('/\n\s+/' , '/\s+\n/') , "\n" , trim($prep1));
$result = '<p>'.str_replace("\n", "</p>\n<p>", $prep2).'</p>'; 
echo $result;
/*
<p>Afrikaans</p>
<p>Shqip - Albanian</p>
<p>Euskara - Basque</p>
*/
?>

Explanation:

$prep0 and $prep1: Make sure each line ends with \n.

$prep2: Remove redundant whitespace. Keep linebreaks.

$result: Add p tags.

If you don't include $prep0, $prep1 and $prep2, $result will look like this:

<p>Afrikaans  
</p>
<p>Shqip - Albanian   
</p>
<p>Euskara - Basque</p>

Not very nice, I think.

Also, don't use preg_replace unless you have to. In most cases, str_replace is faster (at least according to my experience). See the comments below for more information.

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No, I don't agree. isn't it a bit complicated for such a trifle task? and did you really experienced any difference between preg_replace and str_replace. I can't believe that. –  Your Common Sense Sep 19 '10 at 8:54
    
Isn't it a bit complicated for such a trifle task? you ask. Well, that depends on whether you care about how your code is formatted or not. If you don't care and think it's ok that your code looks like in the grey box right above, don't use $prep0, $prep1 and $prep2. If you do care, like I do, and want well formatted code, use $prep0, $prep1 and $prep2. –  matsolof Sep 19 '10 at 10:27
    
I believe in optimizing code whenever it's possible. As long as your scripts are relatively small or doesn't handle very big strings or arrays, you won't notice a difference between optimized code and not optimized code. However, if your scripts later become bigger or have to handle bigger strings or arrays you will notice a difference. –  matsolof Sep 19 '10 at 10:31
1  
Also, on php.net, the official PHP site, it says on the page php.net/manual/en/function.str-replace.php: "If you don't need fancy replacing rules (like regular expressions), you should always use this function [str_replace] instead of ereg_replace() or preg_replace()." –  matsolof Sep 19 '10 at 10:33
1  
As a matter of fact, yes. Among others, I've written scripts to count large number of words (several millions). Using str_replace instead of preg_replace have sometimes made these scripts several seconds faster. At least as I write code. I'm no PHP expert, though. –  matsolof Sep 19 '10 at 23:09

Try:

$variable = 'Afrikaans
Shqip - Albanian  
Euskara - Basque';

$result = preg_replace("/\r\n/", "<p>$1</p>", $variable);
echo $result;
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