Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Essentially, I'd love to be able to define a variable as one thing unless that thing doesn't exist. I swear that somewhere I saw a shorthand conditional that looked something like this:

$var=$_GET["var"] || "default";

But I can't find any documentation to do this right, and honestly it might have been JS or ASP or something where I saw it.

I understand that all that should be happening in the above code is just to check if either statement returns true. But I thought I saw someone do something that essentially defined a default if the first failed. Is this something anyone knows about and can help me? Am I crazy? It just seems redundant to say:

$var=($_GET["var"]) ? $_GET["var"] : "default";

or especially redundant to say:

if ($_GET["var"]) { $var=$_GET["var"]; } else { $var="default"; }

Thoughts?

share|improve this question
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 11 down vote accepted

In PHP 5.3+, you can do:

$var = $_GET["var"] ?: "default";

This is an extension to the ternary operator, borrowed from GCC et al.

EDIT: This will cause warnings if 'var' can be undefined (which is the premise of the question). An approach similar to Fanis's answer is better.

share|improve this answer
    
Fantastic! That's what I was looking for. Googling it got me to something that seems to explain that Javascript does my above notation. Unfortunately, I don't have PHP 5.3 installed on my server, and that's not really up to me. –  Ben Saufley Sep 17 '10 at 19:49
    
I forgot that I couldn't insert returns in my comment. Just wanted to end by saying thanks! –  Ben Saufley Sep 17 '10 at 19:50
    
Also, you're correct about JavaScript. For the logical (short-circuit) operators, || and &&, JavaScript returns the last value it evaluates. So if the first value in an || is falsy (e.g. undefined), it returns the second. However, PHP always returns true or false for logical operators. –  Matthew Flaschen Sep 17 '10 at 20:00
    
Using this method on an undefined index within an array raises a notice: Notice: Undefined index: var in XXXXX on line XXX –  billyonecan Oct 16 '13 at 9:31
    
@billyonecan, good point. The ternary shortcut is not really suitable if either side can be undefined/non-existent. Of course, that's the premise of the question, so this really should be unaccepted (and maybe even deleted, which I can't do if it's the accepted answer). –  Matthew Flaschen Oct 17 '13 at 2:03
show 1 more comment

In such cases you should be checking for existence of the variable in $_GET and then whether it's valid for your parameters. For example:

$var = (isset($_GET["var"]) && $_GET['var'] !== '') ? $_GET["var"] : "default";

However, this can become pretty unreadably pretty quickly. I'd say keep it readable by first initializing your variable to a safe default, and then overwriting that with an external one, if that's valid:

$var = "default";
if (isset($_GET['var') && $_GET['var'] !== '') {
    $var = $_GET['var] ;
}

As for your first example, $var=$_GET["var"] || "default"; exists in Javascript: var someVar = incomingVar || "default";

share|improve this answer
    
@Ben, this should probably be the accepted answer. It's a little longer, but it avoids warnings. Also, the check against !== '' is not really about existence, though it may be useful for certain cases. –  Matthew Flaschen Oct 17 '13 at 2:04
    
@MatthewFlaschen This doesn't actually answer the question I had though. It raises valid concerns, so I've upvoted it. But the question was if there was a way to accomplish what you did, shorthand. –  Ben Saufley Jan 3 at 20:47
add comment

Matthew has already mentioned the only way to do it in PHP 5.3. Note that you can also chain them:

$a = false ?: false ?: 'A'; // 'A'

This is not the same as:

$a = false || false || 'A'; // true

The reason why is that PHP is like most traditional languages in this aspect. The logical OR always returns true or false. However, in JavaScript, the final expression is used. (In a series of ORs, it will be the first non-false one.)

var a = false || 'A' || false; // 'A' 
var b = true && 'A' && 'B';    // 'B';
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.