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Sample

void func(void* data)
{
 CResource* resource = (CResource*)data;
 delete resource; // ~CResource never called.
 resource = NULL;
}

Kindly help me to figure out this.

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Destructor must be called. Please provide definition of CResource. –  Alex B Dec 17 '08 at 9:13
1  
could be as simple as data==0 . but we rly need the code to decide what happens :) –  Johannes Schaub - litb Dec 17 '08 at 9:35
    
why down-vote it? –  Paulius Dec 17 '08 at 9:58
    
The question shows lack of understand of basic principles, yet tries to ask about more advanced ones. –  Suma Dec 17 '08 at 10:01
    
... and it does it in a bad manner anyway - the code is not complete enough for anyone to give an answer, therefore crystal ball guessing is needed. –  Suma Dec 17 '08 at 10:02
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7 Answers

Summarized possible reasons why CResource destructor may be not called, extracted from other answers:

Incomplete type

One possible cause is you have the CResource type only declared, not defined:

class CResource;

void func(void* data)
{
 CResource* resource = (CResource*)data;
 delete resource; // ~CResource never called.
 resource = NULL;
}

This is an undefined behaviour (deleting incomplete type). In a case like this compiler should issue a warning about destructor not called (Visual C++ definitely does issue it). If this is the case, make sure you have the type defined at the place where you are destructing it (include required headers).

NULL pointer

If data is NULL, delete does nothing and does not call any destructor.

Type mismatch

If CResource destructor is virtual and the object stored on memory pointed to by data is actually a different type, you get an undefined behavior. Often a different destructor will be called (if the object has another virtual destructor), in other situations the program may crash (if the object has no virtual destructor).

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type information will be added with the object created on the heap when object is created with new? –  yesraaj Dec 17 '08 at 9:32
    
Type information will indeed be added with the object created on the heap when object is created with new, but only if the object is of a class that has at least one virtual method. –  Daniel Earwicker Dec 17 '08 at 9:59
    
Type information needed for a destructor call is a static (compile time) thing. When a type is not defined, the compiler does not know if destructors exists or not, or what the destructor is (is it virtual or not). –  Suma Dec 17 '08 at 10:00
    
Wouldn't the linker take care of that? I mean, the destructor is always there (compiler generates the default one, if you don't provide one), so compiler is safe to assume, that destructor exists, and that the linker will find it. At least, that's how understand the hole compiler-linker relation... –  Paulius Dec 17 '08 at 10:22
1  
it's clearly stated by the std that delete on a pointer of incomplete type is undefined behavior if the complete type would have a non-trivial destructor (user-defined). –  Johannes Schaub - litb Dec 17 '08 at 10:46
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The only reason, why the destructor wouldn't be called, is if the data pointer is 0 (or NULL). That's how delete works - it checks if the pointer isn't 0, and if it isn't - it calls the necessary destructors and releases the memory.

As pointed out in the comment. There is another reason why it wouldn't get called. If data points to some other class (not CResource) object and both classes have virtual destructors, then the destructor of that other class will be called.

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Or if data points to something other than a CResource, and CResource has virtual destructor. delete will attempt to use VMT from a 'bad' object and may randomly call something else. –  Roddy Dec 17 '08 at 13:12
    
Oh, I guess I'll update my answer then. –  Paulius Dec 17 '08 at 13:36
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Is the destructor virtual? Maybe data doesn't point to a CResource object at all and the virtual destructor of some other class is being called.

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class Aardvark
{
public:
    virtual ~Aardvark()
    {
    	printf("Aardvark::~Aardvark\n");
    }
};

class CResource
{
public:
    virtual ~CResource()
    {
    	printf("CResource::~CResource\n");
    }
};

void func(void* data)
{
    CResource* resource = (CResource*)data;
    delete resource; // ~CResource never called.
    resource = NULL;
}

int _tmain()
{
    void *data = new Aardvark();
    func( data );
    return 0;
}
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just a question. If the classes would have more virtual functions, and the destructor would be 1st virtual function in one class, and the 5th in the second. Would the destructor of Aardvark still get called? Or would it call one of the other virtual members? –  Paulius Dec 17 '08 at 13:44
    
I just tried that with my sample. With the destructor being the first virtual function in CResource this code actually calls the first function in the vtable of Aardvark whether that is a destructor or not. I'm guessing this probably comes under the heading of 'undefined behaviour' though. –  Paul Mitchell Dec 17 '08 at 13:49
    
This depends on how compiler implements this. In Visual Studio the destructor is always the first entry in the virtual function table. –  Suma Dec 17 '08 at 15:08
    
Very interesting... Subtle bug's might come up, even when you're using the same class, and you changed the ordering of functions and didn't rebuild the entire project... Very interesting... –  Paulius Dec 17 '08 at 20:04
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Destructor is called.Give us the full code.

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Why are you saying dtor is not called? Probably because you added a printf in your dtor, and you're not seeing any message?

Probably another dotr is invoked? Is CResource inherited? Di you define the base class destructor virtual?

As rajKumar is pointing out, give us the full code and we'll try to help you.

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I assume CResource is a superclass of some sort for you to allow easy transfer of objects via generalized pointers.

Then your question is a normal one for C++ newbies, and you should read

http://www.parashift.com/c++-faq-lite/virtual-functions.html#faq-20.7

Additionally, get a copy of Scott Meyer's "Effective C++" because it will introduce you to a lot of errors you will be making the next months.

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