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I've written a Python utility to scan log files for known error patterns.

I was trying to speed up the search by providing the regex engine with additional pattern info. For example, not only that I'm looking for lines with gold, I require that such line must start with an underscore, so: ^_.*gold instead of gold.

As 99% of the lines do not start with an underscore I was expecting a big performance payoff because the regex engine could abort reading the line after just one character. I was surprised to learn the other way.

The following program illustrated the problem:

import re
from time import time
def main():
    line = r'I do not start with an underscore 123456789012345678901234567890'
    p1 = re.compile(r"^_") # requires  underscore as a first char
    p2 = re.compile(r"abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz")
    patterns = (p1, p2)

    for p in patterns:
        start = time()
        for i in xrange(1000*1000):
            match = re.search(p, line)
        end = time() 
        print 'Elapsed: ' + str(end-start) 
main()

I've tried reviewing sre_compile.py looking for an explanation, but its code was too hairy for me.

Could the observed performance be explained by that that the inclusion of the start of line character turns the regex engine operation from a simple substring op to a much more complicated backtracking state machine op? Thereby outweighing any benefits like aborting the search after the first character?

Thinking so, I tried multiplying the line's length by x8, expecting the start of line search to shine, but instead the gap only grow wider (22sec Vs 6sec).

I'm puzzled :o am I missing something here?

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1  
interesting question! curiously, Perl's regex implementation doesn't seem to suffer from this problem (the starts-with-underscore pattern is faster by ~25%) –  Eli Bendersky Sep 18 '10 at 12:48
    
@Eli: what I'm actually busy doing is converting my utility from Perl to Python (having just learned Python). After applying all of the improvements suggested here, my Python utility is still X4 times slower than the its Perl sister utility. Then again, I've used a fancy generator to read the file, etc, so... I can't complain. –  Gili Nachum Sep 19 '10 at 13:01

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You're actually doing two things wrong: If you want to look at the beginning of the string use match not search. Also, don't use re.match( pattern, line), compile the pattern and use pattern.match(line).

import re
from time import time
def main():
    line = r'I do not start with an underscore 123456789012345678901234567890'
    p1 = re.compile(r"_") # requires  underscore as a first char
    p2 = re.compile(r"abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz")
    patterns = (p1, p2)

    for p in patterns:
        start = time()
        for i in xrange(1000*1000):
            match = p.match(line)
        end = time() 
        print 'Elapsed: ' + str(end-start) 
main()

You will see that you have the expected behavior now - both pattern take exactly the same time.

share|improve this answer
    
but you've changed the semantics of the search, so what's the point? –  Eli Bendersky Sep 18 '10 at 13:06
    
This is not quite correct - you have to change the sixth line to p2 = re.compile(r".*abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz") or the functionality is different. After all, p2 should be searched for anywhere in the line. –  Tim Pietzcker Sep 18 '10 at 13:08
    
@Eli Bendersky: The point is that if you want the pattern to fail on the first comparison you need to use match, not search. @Tim Pietzcker: Right. Btw: r".*abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz" will very long, because of the backtracking re engine (first .* matches everything, then it starts backtracking a lot). r".-abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz" is the well-behaved pattern for this case. –  Jochen Ritzel Sep 18 '10 at 14:32
    
Yes I know the diff between search and match. I plan to use the method that proves to be the fastest. search() has the advantage that the patterns are less verbose. I accept the compile remarks. I'm sure re.search doesn't recompile a compiled pattern, but it did save time! End of day: switching to match() lowered the match time for ^_ pattern considerably (0.71s vs 1.96s before), but on the expense of increase the match time for .*abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz.* (1.06 vs 0.69s before). I guess search() is optimized for simple patterns while match() is optimized for more complex ones. –  Gili Nachum Sep 18 '10 at 17:08
    
@Gili Nachum: write r".*?abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz". That's what I meant before, for some reason I just thought non-greedy matches are -, not *?. –  Jochen Ritzel Sep 18 '10 at 18:00

How about

if line[0] == "_" and "gold" in line:
   print "Yup, it starts with an underscore"
else:
   print "Nope it doesn't"

Seriously, don't overuse regex

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2  
I can't decide whether this answer is more patronizing or insulting –  Eli Bendersky Sep 18 '10 at 12:36
3  
Probably line.startswith('_') would be better. –  Daenyth Sep 18 '10 at 12:46
1  
I appreciate the suggestion to keep it simple. It's just that my real needs are more complex. I do need real complicated regexps, I've narrowed it down in the above for the sake of the question. –  Gili Nachum Sep 18 '10 at 17:14
    
@EliBendersky: honestly, sometimes the simpler solution is way better. in this case apparently not, but you couldn't necessarily tell that from the question –  Claudiu Jul 10 '13 at 4:57

Regexes don't always behave as you'd expect. I don't understand the internals, so I can't precisely explain the behavior. One thing to note, if you change from search to match, the patterns switch which is faster (though that isn't exactly what you want).

You're doing the right thing: measure and use the technique that is empirically faster.

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That's what I'll end up doing. That and SO recommendations :) Thanks. –  Gili Nachum Sep 18 '10 at 17:15

Interesting observation! I've played a bit with it. My guess would be that the regexp engine will scan the entire string for an underscore, and matches this against a line beginning once a match has been found. Perhaps this has to do with uniform behaviour when using re.MULTILINE

If you use re.match in stead of re.search for the underscore pattern, both seem to be equally fast, i.e.

def main():
    line = r'I do not start with an underscore 123456789012345678901234567890'
    p1 = re.compile(r"_.*") # requires  underscore as a first char
    p2 = re.compile(r"abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz")
    patterns = (p1, p2)

    start = time()
    for i in xrange(1000*1000):
        match = re.match(p1, line)
    end = time() 
    print 'Elapsed: ' + str(end-start) 
    start = time()
    for i in xrange(1000*1000):
        match = re.search(p2, line)
    end = time() 
    print 'Elapsed: ' + str(end-start) 

In this case, match will require a match to start matching at the beginning of the string.

Also, be aware that the following use of precompiled patterns seems to be faster:

for p in patterns:
    start = time()
    for i in xrange(1000*1000):
        match = p.search(line)
    end = time() 
    print 'Elapsed: ' + str(end-start)

But the speed difference remains...

share|improve this answer
    
It's indeed useful to separate the time spent compiling the pattern (which can be substantial in some cases) and the time spent matching it. However, I suspect this can probably be best described as a bug introduced either into PCRE or - more likely - into the conversion of it for Python; other RE engines seem to do just fine detecting whether to use anchored matching just from the REs themselves. (RE engines are really tricky code; there are some utterly Codethulhu-level evil gotchas in there.) –  Donal Fellows Sep 18 '10 at 23:23

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