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I just finished working out a memory allocation problem with the current program I'm writing, but I am not happy with what I had to do to fix it.

In my program, I was building up an array of structs, reallocating space for the array every time I wanted to add a struct to it. Here is a generic version of my struct and the function that would add a struct to the array:

typedef struct Example {
    const char* name;
    int (*func)(int, int);
    int bool_switch;
}

int add_struct_to_array( Example **example_array, int *ex_array_size, int name, int (*func)(int, int), int bool_switch)
{
    // first, make a new struct
    Example *new_example = (Example *) calloc( 1, sizeof( Example ) );
    if( new_example != NULL ) {
        new_example->name = name;
        new_example->func = func;
        new_example->bool_switch = bool_switch;
        ( *ex_array_size )++;
    } else {
        printf( "Errror allocating %s\n", name );
        exit( -1 );
    }

    // now, realloc the array of structs and add the new member to it
    Example **temp_example_array = ( Example** )realloc( example_array, ( *ex_array_size ) * sizeof( Example* ) );
    if( temp_example_array != NULL ) {
        example_array = temp_example_array;
        example_array[ ( *ex_array_size ) - 1 ] = new_example;
    } else {
        printf( "Reallocation failed\n" )
        exit( -1 );
    }
    return 0;
}

And here is where I would call the functions (notice how I'm initially allocating the array of structs, cuz that's where the problem was)

#include "example_struct.h"

int main( int argc, char **argv )
{
    int ex_array_size = 0;
    Example **example_array = ( Example** )calloc( 0, sizeof( Example* ) );

    add_struct_to_array( example_array, &ex_array_size, "name", &function, 1 );
    ...
    ...
    add_struct_to_array( example_array, &ex_array_size, "other_name", &other_func, 0 );

    /* Do stuff here */

    example_array_free( example_array );

    return 0;
}

In my ignorance, I apparently thought that allocating the array with size 0 would be ok, since it was initially empty, and I could add structs to it after that. Obviously, this did not work, I would get runtime errors about error for object 0x100100080: pointer being reallocated was not allocated. The example_array was at address 0x100100080 and the first struct I would allocate for would be at address 0x100100090, and after a few reallocations the example_array would run out of room.

So, finally, to my question. I solved this problem by allocating more space for my example_array than I would need, but that seems very inelegant. Is there a better way to do this?

**EDIT**

Ok, so from the looks of most of the responses, I shouldn't be using pointers to pointers. So, I am trying it a slightly different way, mixing pmg and crypto's responses. Here is my code now:

/* example_struct.h */
int add_struct_to_array( Example *example_array, int *ex_array_size, int name, int (*func)(int, int), int bool_switch)
{
    Example temp_example_array = realloc( example_array, ( ( *ex_array_size ) + 1 ) * sizeof( Example ) );

    if( temp_example_array != NULL ) {
        example_array = temp_example_array;
        Example new_example;
        new_example.name = name;
        new_example.func = func;
        new_example.bool_switch = bool_switch;
        example_array[ ( *ex_array_size ) ] = new_example;
        ++( *ex_array_size );
    } else {
        fprintf( stderr, "Error reallocating for %s", name );
        exit( -1 );
    }
    return 0;
}



/* main.c */
...
...
#include "example_struct.h"
int main( int argc, char **argv )
{
    int ex_array_size = 0;
    Example *example_array = NULL;

    add_struct_to_array( example_array, &ex_array_size, "name", &func, 1 );
    add_struct_to_array( ... );
    ...
    add_struct_to_array( example_array, &ex_array_size, "other name", &other_func, 0 );

    example_free( example_array );
}

Everything compiles and realloc's alright, but I have trouble accessing the structs within the array.

/* main.c */
...
...
#include "example_struct.h"
int main( int argc, char **argv )
{
    int ex_array_size = 0;
    Example *example_array = NULL;

    add_struct_to_array( example_array, &ex_array_size, "name", &func, 1 );
    add_struct_to_array( ... );
    ...
    add_struct_to_array( example_array, &ex_array_size, "other name", &other_func, 0 );


    printf( "%s\n", example_array[0].name ) /* Segfault */


    example_free( example_array );
}

Thanks again for all your help.

share|improve this question
    
Why do you need a pointer to pointer to Example? A single pointer is enough to make as large an "array" as you need. –  pmg Sep 18 '10 at 14:57
    
Shouldn't the line 2 in the add_struct_to_array() function use (Example *) as typecast, rather than (example *)? –  user191776 Sep 18 '10 at 15:42
    
Tip: You don't need to explicitly typecast the void * returned by calloc, malloc or realloc. Read this: stackoverflow.com/questions/1835193/… –  user191776 Sep 18 '10 at 15:53
1  
@pmg: the array stores pointers to structs, not structs themselves. (Storing structs directly in the array might be more efficient, of course.) –  Porculus Sep 18 '10 at 17:29
1  
@W_P, Isn't name an int? Trying to print it using %s will cause an error. –  user191776 Sep 18 '10 at 18:27

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Here's a minimum working version (with C++ keywords for lots of identifiers -- I kinda apologize, but it looked fun when I started and I couldn't stop or go back midway through) which also runs on ideone ( http://ideone.com/iMByR )

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

struct protected {
  int this;
  int (*catch)(int, int);
  int friend;
};

int catch(int mutable, int virtual) {
  return mutable + virtual;
}

struct protected *add_one(struct protected **private,
                          int *explicit, int using,
                          int (*catch)(int, int), int friend) {
  struct protected *new;

  new = realloc(*private, (*explicit + 1) * sizeof *new);
  if (new) {
    *private = new;
    (*private)[*explicit].this = using;
    (*private)[*explicit].catch = catch;
    (*private)[*explicit].friend = friend;
    (*explicit)++;
  }
  return new;
}

/* create an array of structs using dynamic memory */
/* keep adding elements to it, and growing it as needed */
int main(void) {
  int using;
  /* explicit contains the number of elements in the try array */
  int explicit = 0;
  struct protected *try = NULL;

  /* create and grow */
  for (using = 0; using < 7; using++) {
    if (add_one(&try, &explicit, using + 1, catch, 0) == NULL) {
      fprintf(stderr, "failure at loop %d\n", using);
      exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
    }
  }

  /* verify */
  for (using = 0; using < explicit; using++) {
    printf("%d: %d\n", using, try[using].this);
  }

  free(try);
  return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
ha! I have pretty much the same thing, except for the lines is the add_one function where you have (*private)[*explicit].this = ...etc I didn't have *private in parens, and was getting a segfault...thanks for the help, and btw love the c++ keywords as identifiers! –  Paul Woolcock Sep 18 '10 at 21:03
    
hehe, don't do it often tough (the C++ keywords as C identifiers): you'll create more enemies than friends :D –  pmg Sep 18 '10 at 21:21

realloc takes NULL as the pointer value very fine ... and does a malloc in that case

*p = NULL;
new = realloc(p, 42); /* same as new = malloc(42); */
if (!new) { /* error */ }
p = new;

So, forget about calloc (you will overwrite the zeroes right after, anyway), initialize your pointers to NULL and realloc at will.

int main(void) {
    Example *example_array = NULL;
    add_struct_to_array(&example_array, &ex_array_size, "name", function, 1);
    /* ... */
    free(example_array);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Neat trick using NULL. From the man page of realloc: "Unless ptr is NULL, it must have been returned by an earlier call to malloc(), calloc() or realloc()." –  user191776 Sep 18 '10 at 15:55
    
and before that it (man 3 calloc) says: "if ptr is NULL, then the call is equivalent to malloc(size)" –  pmg Sep 18 '10 at 16:04
    
I have changed my code around a bit, care to take a look at my edited question? –  Paul Woolcock Sep 18 '10 at 18:14
    
In your new version you have to pass the address of example_array to the add_struct_to_array function: add_struct_to_array(&example_array, ...) and change it inside the function after a successful reallocation. –  pmg Sep 18 '10 at 20:31

Try the following changes. You wouldn't need to allocate any additional space.

Edit: Adding changes suggested by pmg & Bart van Ingen Schenau

int add_struct_to_array( Example ***example_array, int *ex_array_size, int name, int (*func)(int, int), int bool_switch)
{
     Example **temp_example_array = realloc(*example_array,((*ex_array_size) + 1) * sizeof(Example *) );
     Example *new_example = calloc(1, sizeof( Example ) );

    if( temp_example_array != NULL && new_example != NULL ) {
        *example_array = temp_example_array;
        *example_array[ *ex_array_size ] = new_example;
        new_example->name = name;
        new_example->func = func;
        new_example->bool_switch = bool_switch;
        ( *ex_array_size )++;
    } else {
        printf( "Error allocating %s\n", name );
        exit( -1 );
    }
    return 0;
}


#include "example_struct.h"

int main( int argc, char **argv )
{
    int ex_array_size = 0;
    Example **example_array = calloc( 0, sizeof( Example* ) );

    add_struct_to_array( &example_array, &ex_array_size, "name", &function, 1 );
    ...

    add_struct_to_array( &example_array, &ex_array_size, "other_name", &other_func, 0 );

    ...

    example_array_free( example_array );

    return 0;
}

To avoid breaking any of your other code, I have used the pointer-to-pointer example_array. Although, a better solution would be to simple use a pointer to the struct, & keep realloc()ing space to it.

share|improve this answer
2  
In principle NEVER assign the result of realloc to the pointer you're reallocating. Doing that causes a memory leak when realloc fails, because you overwrite the good old value with NULL –  pmg Sep 18 '10 at 16:01
    
but where crypto is assigning the result of realloc to the pointer he's reallocating is protected by if( temp_arry != NULL ), so if realloc fails, it won't overwrite anything... –  Paul Woolcock Sep 18 '10 at 17:06
    
I like your answer the best, but I still get the runtime errors :/ –  Paul Woolcock Sep 18 '10 at 18:00
    
I have changed my code around a bit, care to take a look at my edited question? –  Paul Woolcock Sep 18 '10 at 18:15
1  
Unfortunately, the add_struct_to_array function does not work. The example_array variable in main never gets updated with the result from realloc, because the function is changing a copy of the variable. –  Bart van Ingen Schenau Sep 18 '10 at 18:16

It seems like an std::vector would fit your needs perfectly. It's as fast as an array and knows how to manage the memory. A simple example is below.

A vector uses contiguous memory just as an array does. If you know how many Example objects are needed you can tell the vector how large it needs to be in the constructor. If you do not know how many there will be the vector will grow to meet your needs. If performance is important then try to allocate the total amoutn of memory in the constructor because when a vector reallocates it will create a new chunk of continous memory and then copy each object into the new memory area (Examples constructor's and destructor's will be executed when this happens).

Check out the different constructors, capacity(), and reserve() of a vector here.

#include <vector>

int function_1(int a, int b) {
    return 100;
}

int function_2(int a, int b) {
    return 200;
}

typedef struct  {
    int name;
    int (*func)(int, int);
    int bool_switch;
} example_t;

typedef std::vector<example_t> example_container_t;

int main() {
    example_container_t container;

    example_t example_1;
    example_1.name = 1;
    example_1.func = &function_1;
    example_1.bool_switch = true;
    container.push_back(example_1);

    example_t example_2;
    example_2.name = 1;
    example_2.func = &function_1;
    example_2.bool_switch = true;
    container.push_back(example_2);
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
2  
What makes you think W_P wants to change his code to C++? :) –  pmg Sep 18 '10 at 15:38
    
I may be wrong, but isn't #include <vector> C++? –  user191776 Sep 18 '10 at 16:00
1  
The source very much looked like example code (i.e. Example class, didn't have real functions, duidn't compile, etc). I thought maybe W_P was open to suggestion being in such an early phase. @W_P - my apologies if this wasn't the case. –  skimobear Sep 18 '10 at 16:27
1  
no problem, I just don't like c++ :p –  Paul Woolcock Sep 18 '10 at 16:58

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