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What is exactly meant by high-level and low-level implementation of an algorithm?

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Are there such term that is in common use? Where did you first find the two implementation name? – Shamim Hafiz Sep 18 '10 at 16:28

It's all about the distance from the hardware, most of the time. It's still relative to what you're talking about but often it's relative to the hardware. Software is the layer over the hardware and like atmosphere it can go on high altitudes too, far from the hardware, the "ground".

When we talk about low-level implementation, we talk about "details", about what the hardware will do, what basic instructions will be executed.

When we talk about high-level implementation, we talk about "the idea", that is the whole concept we want to manipulate, how to manipulate it without entering in details.

Saying that you take the bus 21 to go from your house to your dayjob is high level. Saying that you start your day at 22 Smith Street at 7am, wait for the bus to come at 8am just in front of the door and enter in it; then wait until the bus make 5 stops then go out of the bus and go in the building in front of you and sit down and work... is low-level.

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Agree with 1-st answer that it is not in common use, so I will make another guess:

  • high-level - diagram, math, idea
  • low-level - specific programming language implementation
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Welcome to SO! Answers are viewed in different orders with some additional randomness. The "first answer" displayed to you can easily be elsewhere for others. Mentioning who wrote the answer or linking helps. – Roger Pate Sep 18 '10 at 20:22

Since those terms are not in common use, to my knowledge, I can only venture a guess or two:

a) it means whether the algorithm is implemented using an highlevel language and some libraries, or whether it is done with implementing every part "close to the metal", where you handle everything yourself.

b) it may also refer to whether the implementation makes uses of other algorithm implementations. If other algorithm implementations are used, its "higher" level.

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