Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to get my Scala code to be a bit more idiomatic. Right now it just looks like Java code.

I'm trying to do a simple boolean regex matching function in Scala, since I cannot seem to find it in the standard library(?)

I don't think the result is particularly nice with the try-catch and all. Also, a precondition is that 'patt' has exactly one group, which I don't really use for anything. Any input?

def doesMatchRegEx(subj:String, patt:scala.util.matching.Regex) = {
    try{
        val Match = patt
        val Match(x) = subj
        true
    } catch {
        // we didnt match and therefore got an error
    case e:MatchError => false
    }
}

Use:

scala> doesMatchRegEx("foo",".*(foo).*".r)
res36: Boolean = true

scala> doesMatchRegEx("bar",".*(foo).*".r)
res37: Boolean = false
share|improve this question
    
See also "How to check whether a String fully matches a Regex in Scala?" stackoverflow.com/questions/3021813/… . –  mkneissl Sep 19 '10 at 11:52
    
Thanks, that's a nice discussion of the topic. –  Grav Sep 20 '10 at 11:56
add comment

1 Answer 1

up vote 9 down vote accepted
def doesMatchRegEx(subj:String, patt:scala.util.matching.Regex) = subj match {
  case patt(_) => true
  case _ => false
}

As you can see, this actually makes the 'doesMatchRegEx method kind of superfluous.

As does this:

"foo".matches(".*(foo).*") // => true
"bar".matches(".*(foo).*") // => false
".*(foo).*".r.findFirstIn("foo").isDefined // => true
share|improve this answer
    
In my eager to use Scala, I completely forgot that I'm using java.lang.String and that it has a matches-method. Thanks for that :-) About the match-case-thing - also nice, but as I see it, I still have to wrap it in a method to use it as a boolean expression - how is it superfluous? –  Grav Sep 18 '10 at 22:49
    
Since everything in Scala gives back something the match also does this. So you can write val b = subj match ... and b will contain true/false. If thats what you mean? –  Plankalkül Sep 19 '10 at 0:09
    
Yes you're right, the match could just be used instead. I didn't get that at first. –  Grav Sep 19 '10 at 9:22
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.