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I have a base class

class Animal 

with pure virtual functions, and a set of derived classes

class Monkey : public Animal 
class Snake : public Animal

I want to implement a comparison operation so that, if I encounter two pointers to Animals in my code

Animal* animal1
Animal* animal2

I can compare them to each other. The comparison should yield false, if animal1 and animal2 are of different derived classes. If they are of the same derived class, the output of the comparison operator should be returned.

Can someone point me to a good way of implementing this?

share|improve this question
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Wow, a lot of the other answers were so totally unnecessary. dynamic_cast- it exists, use it.

class Animal {
public:
    virtual bool operator==(const Animal& other) = 0;
    virtual ~Animal() = 0;
};
template<class T> class AnimalComp : public Animal {
public:
    virtual bool operator==(const Animal& ref) const {
        if (const T* self = dynamic_cast<const T*>(&ref)) {
            return ((T*)this)->operator==(*self);
        }
        return false;
    }
    virtual bool operator!=(const Animal& ref) const {
        if (const T* self = dynamic_cast<const T*>(&ref)) {
            return ((T*)this)->operator!=(*self);
        }
        return true;
    }
};
class Monkey : public AnimalComp<Monkey> {
public:
    virtual bool operator==(const Monkey& other) const {
        return false;
    }
    virtual bool operator!=(const Monkey& other) const {
        return false;
    }
};
class Snake : public AnimalComp<Snake> {
public:
    virtual bool operator==(const Snake& other) const {
        return false;
    }
    virtual bool operator!=(const Snake& other) const {
        return false;
    }
};

Edit: Bow before my automatic templated implementation!

Edit edit: One thing I did do was forget to tag them as const, which was wrong of me. I will not apologize for not doing != as, let's face it, implementing it is a total doddle.

More edits: Jesus Christ guys, this is not an example on how to write != or ==, it's an example of how to use the CRTP. If you don't like how I chose to implement my != or ==, you can sue.

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, better with the operator== overload. – imaginaryboy Sep 18 '10 at 22:09
    
Minor error though, needs to be const monkey* p = dynamic_cast<const Monkey*>(&other) and return *this == *p ... references aren't convertible to bool. – imaginaryboy Sep 18 '10 at 22:22
    
@imaginaryboy: Yeah, I fixed it up to a much better solution. – Puppy Sep 18 '10 at 22:28
    
That is very beautiful, thanks alot. One more question: Why is the destructor of Animal pure virtual? - this way it doesn't compile. If you replace that by virtual ~Animal() {} it works perfectly though. – Hans Sep 18 '10 at 22:34
    
It compiles fine on my compiler. :P Seriously, it doesn't really matter, I just made it pure virtual out of habit. – Puppy Sep 18 '10 at 22:46

One way to implement this, is to use double-dispatch to differentiate between 'same class' and 'different classes':

class Monkey;
class Snake;

class Animal {
public:
  virtual bool compare_impl(const Animal*) const { return false; }
  virtual bool compare_impl(const Monkey*) const { return false; }
  virtual bool compare_impl(const Snake*) const { return false; }
  virtual bool compare(const Animal* rhs) const =0;
};

class Monkey : public Animal {
private:
  /* Override the default behaviour for two Monkeys */
  virtual bool compare_impl(const Monkey*) const { /* compare two Monkey's */ }
public:
  /* Let overload-resolution pick the compare_impl for Monkey and let virtual dispatch select the override in the dynamic type of rhs */
  virtual bool compare(const Animal* rhs) const { return rhs->compare_impl(this); }
};

class Snake : public Animal {
private:
  /* Override the default behaviour for two Snakes */
  bool compare_impl(const Snake*) const { /* compare two Snakes */ }
public:
  /* Let overload-resolution pick the compare_impl for Monkey and let virtual dispatch select the override in the dynamic type of rhs */
  virtual bool compare(const Animal* rhs) const { return rhs->compare_impl(this); }
};
share|improve this answer
    
Can you explain what exactly the line using Animal::compare_impl; means? So far, I've seen the keyword "using" only in "using namespace foo" – Hans Sep 18 '10 at 20:01
    
@Hans: It brings a base class' identifier into the derived class' scope, preventing a derived class overload from hiding the base class function. – sbi Sep 18 '10 at 20:05
    
His 'using' declarations are doing two things: 1) changing the access of the base class compare_impl from protected to private, and 2) making Animal::compare_impl accessible since it was otherwise hidden by the derived class's compare_impl declarations. – imaginaryboy Sep 18 '10 at 20:16
    
Oh now I get the trick that inside the compare functions, the sides are reversed (this->compare_impl(rhs) becomes rhs->compare_impl(this)). The only thing that's bothering me about this solution is that I need to put the very same function compare into every single derived class. Is there no way to avoid this? – Hans Sep 18 '10 at 20:19
    
@Hans: You can, but then you have to include a virtual bool compare_impl(const Derived*) const { return false;} member-function in Animal for every derived class. This has the bigger disadvantage that Animal suddenly has to know about all the derived classes. The two things that make this technique work are first the reversal of the arguments (first function calls a member of the argument) and second that all relevant overloads are present where the reverse-call is made. – Bart van Ingen Schenau Sep 18 '10 at 20:25

Since there is no static type information associated with the two pointers, you will need to use RTTI. You can compare the results of type typeid operator to determine if the objects are of the same type.

An alternative would be to add your own type ID to the Animal class. Add another virtual function and have derived classes return something that uniquely identifies the type. You could use an enumeration, or maybe the name of the type as a string. If you can use it, though, RTTI would be much better IMHO.

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+1. In addition - RTTI incurs some runtime overhead (obviously), though not too much. If your application has tons of classes and you only need RTTI in just a few places, I would go with whooping your own solution using a dedicated function for type identification. If RTTI usage is commonplace, though - you should definitely use it over using your own method. – Eldad Mor Sep 18 '10 at 19:42
1  
I think double dispatch might be a better way to do this than manually fiddling with std::type_info objects. What are you going to do once you know it's the right type anyway? You still would have to cast the pointer to a derived class' pointer. And since C++ sports only minimal RTTI, you probably would have to switch over a type. And a switch over a type is usually a strong indication that someone had better used virtual functions. – sbi Sep 18 '10 at 20:08
    
@sbi Agreed, actually. I have spent far too much time begrudgingly programming "The Java Way"(tm). It has obviously affected my C++. – Tim Yates Sep 18 '10 at 20:13
    
Does someone have a double dispatch solution to this that actually works? The one below does not. – imaginaryboy Sep 18 '10 at 21:11

Use type_info class. It defines operator== which return whether the two types describe the same type. Here you can find reference: http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/std/typeinfo/type_info/

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Here is a little trick I use (I hope it can work for you too). I add the following private method to Animal and OVERRIDE it in every derived class (I know, it's a little bit of trouble, but it is faster than RTTI)

class Animal {
protected:

 virtual const void* signature() const 
 {
  static bool dummy;
  return &dummy;
 }
...
}


class Monkey : public Animal {
private:
 virtual const void* signature() const 
 {
  static bool dummy;
  return &dummy;
 }
...
}

now in order to see if 2 pointers (a and b) are of the same class just check for

a->signature()==b->signature()

It's not really a solution, it's a trick, but it works with just 2 virtual method calls (1 for each of the pointers) so it is rather fast.

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