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I have the following code structure:

myClass.h

class myClass
{
public:
    void DoSomething(void);
};

myClass.cpp

#include myClass.h

static const unsigned length = 5;
static myArray<float, length> arrayX;

void myClass::DoSomething(void)
{
    // does something using length and array X
}

Now I want to convert the static variable defined at the file scope to be static members of the class. I do the following;

myClass.h

class myClass
{
    static const unsigned length;
    static myArray<float,length> arrayX;

public:
    void DoSomething(void);
};

myClass.cpp

#include myClass.h

const unsigned myClass::length = 5;
myArray<float, length> myClass::arrayX;

void myClass::DoSomething(void)
{
    // does something using length and array X
}

However, I get an error:

C2975: 'Length' : invalid template argument for 'myArray', expected compile-time constant expression myClass.h

I do understand I get this error because length is not initialized in the header file yet. How can I get around this?

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2  
Surely as you scrolled past the preview to click the Submit button, you would see the formatting is messed up. I attempted to fix it, but you've posted not "real" code, (missing class keyword, Length versus length.), so it's not exact. –  GManNickG Sep 18 '10 at 19:36
    
Why do you need the template parameter to be determined by a static const member instead of a plain const? That value cannot change at runtime no matter what you do. Just make it a const. reuse the const as the initializer for the static const member if you want to have it's value also available. –  IfLoop Sep 18 '10 at 19:41
    
And now you roll it back, once again ignoring the preview...sigh. Twice? Wow. Last time. –  GManNickG Sep 18 '10 at 19:41
1  
Please post an actual minimal compilable example. This will help us a lot and maybe solve your problem before even posting it. –  Gabriel Schreiber Sep 18 '10 at 20:04

3 Answers 3

It needs to be a constant expression, so the best you can do is move = 5 to the header.

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This is legal (and probably preferable) since the static const and the fact that it is an integral type qualify it as a compile-time constant. –  Tim Yates Sep 18 '10 at 19:42

However, I was wondering if there is a way to get around this.

Look at your code again. That myArray<float,length> is declared as a class data member in the header.
In order for the compiler to know what myClass is, it must know the full definition of that data member. But the full definition of myArray<float,length> in turn requires length to be known, because without its template arguments, myArray is not a type, but a template, and data members must be types, not class templates.

From this it's clear that, in order to have a myArray instance as a class member, the length must be known when the class is compiled, myArray is to be a member of.

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Have you tried:

myArray<float, myClass::length> myClass::arrayX;
               ^^^^^^^^^^

You may also need to change header:

class myClass
{
    static const unsigned length = 5;

and change definition of myClass::length in .cpp to not contain "= 5" (or remove it completly).

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