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I'm getting compile error in this line:

cout << (MenuItems[i].Checkbox ? (MenuItems[i].Value ? txt::mn_yes : txt::mn_no) : MenuItems[i].Value)

Error:

menu.cpp|68|error: invalid conversion from 'int' to 'const char*'
menu.cpp|68|error:   initializing argument 1 of 'std::basic_string<_CharT, _Traits, _Alloc>::basic_string(const _CharT*, const _Alloc&) [with _CharT = char, _Traits = std::char_traits<char>, _Alloc = std::allocator<char>]'

MenuItems is std::vector of following class:

class CMenuItem
{
public:
string Name;
int Value;
int MinValue, MaxValue;
bool Checkbox;
CMenuItem (string, int, int, int);
CMenuItem (string, bool);
};

mn_yes and mn_no are std::strings.

Compiler is MinGW (version that is distributed with code::blocks).

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1  
Please specify a more informative title for your post. –  Gintautas Miliauskas Sep 18 '10 at 21:47

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The two possible conditional values have to be convertible to a common type. The problem is that the left of the outer conditional:

(MenuItems[i].Value ? txt::mn_yes : txt::mn_no)

is always a string, but the right:

MenuItems[i].Value

is an int. It tries to find a way by going const char *->string, but then it won't allow the int to const char * conversion (which is good, because it would be meaningless). Just do:

if(MenuItems[i].Checkbox)
{
    cout << (MenuItems[i].Value ? txt::mn_yes : txt::mn_no);
}
else
{
    cout << MenuItems[i].Value;
}

or similar.

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1  
+1 -- I would add convertible to a common type. –  Billy ONeal Sep 18 '10 at 21:49
    
@Billy, thanks. –  Matthew Flaschen Sep 18 '10 at 21:51
    
I'd just add that the different overloads of operator<< are completely separate functions. A particular function call can only refer to a single function (or set of virtual overrides) in C++. –  Potatoswatter Sep 18 '10 at 21:58
    
I did it this way and it works (but I had to take ternary expression after << in brackets) –  Xirdus Sep 18 '10 at 22:03
    
@Xirdus, good point, fixed now. –  Matthew Flaschen Sep 18 '10 at 22:11

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