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I want to transmit data from a Queue using Twisted. I currently use a push producer to poll the queue for items and write to the transport.

class Producer:

    implements(interfaces.IPushProducer)

    def __init__(self, protocol, queue):
        self.queue = queue
        self.protocol = protocol

    def resumeProducing(self):
        self.paused = False
        while not self.paused:
            try:
                data = self.queue.get_nowait()
                logger.debug("Transmitting: '%s'", repr(data))
                data = cPickle.dumps(data)
                self.protocol.transport.write(data + "\r\n")
            except Empty:
                pass

    def pauseProducing(self):
        logger.debug("Transmitter paused.")
        self.paused = True

    def stopProducing(self):
        pass

The problem is, that the data are sent very irregularly and if only one item was in the queue, the data is never going to be sent. It seems that Twisted waits until the data to be transmitted has grown to a specific value until it transmits it. Is the way I implemented my producer the right way? Can I force Twisted to transmit data now?

I've also tried using a pull producer, but Twisted does not call the resumeProducing() method of it at all. Do I have to call the resumeProducer() method from outside, when using a pull producer?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It's hard to say why your producer doesn't work well without seeing a complete example (that is, without also seeing the code that registers it with a consumer and the code which is putting items into that queue).

However, one problem you'll likely have is that if your queue is empty when resumeProducing is called, then you will write no bytes at all to the consumer. And when items are put into the queue, they'll sit there forever, because the consumer isn't going to call your resumeProducing method again.

And this generalizes to any other case where the queue does not have enough data in it to cause the consumer to call pauseProducing on your producer. As a push producer, it is your job to continue to produce data on your own until the consumer calls pauseProducing (or stopProducing).

For this particular case, that probably means that whenever you're going to put something in that queue - stop: check to see if the producer is not paused, and if it is not, write it to the consumer instead. Only put items in the queue when the producer is paused.

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Isn't this a break in the clean design of a producer if I have to check from outside if it is running before i can give him data to process? In my opinion the processing of the data itself should be transparent from outside. –  Manuel Faux Sep 20 '10 at 7:24
1  
That's a really big question. One answer is that - yes, sure, it is; so you should add a method to your producer for enqueueing data, and that method should inspect the state to decide if it should really go into the queue or if it should be written to the consumer immediately. This keeps all of the logic inside the producer class. However, consider that if all of the users of this producer decide to remain ignorant of whether it is paused, then they may eventually overflow the queue. The point of producers is to propagate the low-level buffer-full event so you can avoid overflows. –  Jean-Paul Calderone Sep 21 '10 at 12:52
    
Ok, thank's for your answer. Seems like this is the only solution, since no other answer was posted. But, I'm still not happy with this solution. –  Manuel Faux Sep 22 '10 at 9:51
    
The idea is that you're not really supposed to "check from outside"; the thing that is putting items into the queue ought to be able to be paused as well. You should relay this notification as far back up the chain of responsibility for producing data as possible. Anywhere you can't relay it any further, you have a point where you may be asked to buffer infinite amounts of data; at that point, you need to take into account some kind of strategy for dealing with an unbounded growth of entries in your queue: save them to disk? send rejection messages to your peer? It depends on application. –  Glyph Jun 27 '13 at 7:41

Here are two possible solutions:

1) Periodically poll your local application to see if you have additional data to send.

NB. This relies on a periodic async callback from the deferLater method in twisted. If you need a responsive application that sends data on demand, or a long running blocking operation (eg. ui that uses its own event loop) it may not be appropriate.

Code:

from twisted.internet.protocol import Factory
from twisted.internet.endpoints import TCP4ServerEndpoint
from twisted.internet.interfaces import IPushProducer
from twisted.internet.task import deferLater, cooperate
from twisted.internet.protocol import Protocol
from twisted.internet import reactor
from zope.interface import implementer
import time

# Deferred action
def periodically_poll_for_push_actions_async(reactor, protocol):
  while True:
    protocol.send(b"Hello World\n")
    yield deferLater(reactor, 2, lambda: None)

# Push protocol
@implementer(IPushProducer)
class PushProtocol(Protocol):

   def connectionMade(self):
     self.transport.registerProducer(self, True)
     gen = periodically_poll_for_push_actions_async(self.transport.reactor, self)
     self.task = cooperate(gen)

   def dataReceived(self, data):
     self.transport.write(data)

   def send(self, data):
     self.transport.write(data)

   def pauseProducing(self):
     print 'Workload paused'
     self.task.pause()

   def resumeProducing(self):
     print 'Workload resumed'
     self.task.resume()

   def stopProducing(self):
     print 'Workload stopped'
     self.task.stop()

   def connectionLost(self, reason):
     print 'Connection lost'
     try:
       self.task.stop()
     except:
       pass

# Push factory
class PushFactory(Factory):
  def buildProtocol(self, addr):
    return PushProtocol()

# Run the reactor that serves everything
endpoint = TCP4ServerEndpoint(reactor, 8089)
endpoint.listen(PushFactory())
reactor.run()

2) Manually keep track of Protocol instances and use reactor.callFromThread() from a different thread. Lets you get away with a long blocking operation in the other thread (eg. ui event loop).

Code:

from twisted.internet.protocol import Factory
from twisted.internet.endpoints import TCP4ServerEndpoint
from twisted.internet.interfaces import IPushProducer
from twisted.internet.task import deferLater, cooperate
from twisted.internet.protocol import Protocol
from twisted.internet import reactor, threads
import time
import random
import threading

# Connection
protocol = None

# Some other thread that does whatever it likes.
class SomeThread(threading.Thread):
  def run(self):
    while True:
      print("Thread loop")
      time.sleep(random.randint(0, 4))
      if protocol is not None:
        reactor.callFromThread(self.dispatch)
  def dispatch(self):
    global protocol
    protocol.send("Hello World\n")

# Push protocol
class PushProtocol(Protocol):

   def connectionMade(self):
     global protocol
     protocol = self

   def dataReceived(self, data):
     self.transport.write(data)

   def send(self, data):
     self.transport.write(data)

   def connectionLost(self, reason):
     print 'Connection lost'

# Push factory
class PushFactory(Factory):
  def buildProtocol(self, addr):
    return PushProtocol()

# Start thread
other = SomeThread()
other.start()

# Run the reactor that serves everything
endpoint = TCP4ServerEndpoint(reactor, 8089)
endpoint.listen(PushFactory())
reactor.run()

Personally, I find the fact that IPushProducer and IPullProducer require a periodic callback, makes them less useful. Others disagree... shrug. Take your pick.

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You don't seem to understand how flow-control and buffer management work. Without the notifications from your transport's IConsumer implementation (the thing with the registerProducer method, the thing that calls pauseProducing/resumeProducing on you), if one of your clients is reading too slowly (this is known as a "trickle attack" if it's done intentionally, or a "crummy GSM connection" otherwise) then the data passed to transport.write will buffer infinitely and your program will eventually run out of memory and crash. –  Glyph Jun 27 '13 at 7:38
    
@Glyph If you have a better solution on how to write a push consumer, post it as a solution. Here are two facts: 1) you can't write a server that infrequently pushes updates using IPushProducer. 2) you can't write one using IPullProducer. So, if you've got some clever way of doing it, how about posting it? –  Doug Jun 27 '13 at 8:04
    
(1) is incorrect. You can certainly do this. –  Jean-Paul Calderone Jun 27 '13 at 13:02
    
@Jean-PaulCalderone no, you cant. If you have an indeterminate amount of time during which you send no data, the IPushProducer will never be suspend. Don't think so? Go on, post a solution that does. Remember that unless transport.write() is invoked you will never be suspended. –  Doug Jun 28 '13 at 1:20
    
If you're not sending data, you don't need to be "suspended" (we usually say paused). You only need to be paused when the downstream send buffer is full. Here's an example - gist.github.com/exarkun/5884100 –  Jean-Paul Calderone Jun 28 '13 at 11:44

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