Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
#define one 0
#ifdef one
printf("one is defined ");
#ifndef one
printf("one is not defined ");

In this what is the role of #ifdef and #ifndef, and what's the output?

share|improve this question
19  
The question has been fixed by Kugelman. As it is stated now it is a valid, even if naive, question. Reopen please. Or is this site only for gurus? –  slashmais Sep 19 '10 at 5:31
13  
PS: SO saved me a lot of time that would have been wasted sifting thru the stuff returned by Google. When I start a new language I too have lots of really stupid lapses of insight that would be easily resolved by someone who has been there before. Let SO be a resource for all programmers, at all levels. –  slashmais Sep 19 '10 at 5:38
5  
+1 to slashmais, also +1 to Mentalikryst for the textbook mention but -1 about Google. Quite often Google doesn't help when you don't know what to look for or you try searching for code. –  casablanca Sep 19 '10 at 5:50
7  
#define one 0? Intuitive... –  AshleysBrain Sep 19 '10 at 13:36

2 Answers 2

Text inside an ifdef/endif or ifndef/endif pair will be left in or removed by the pre-processor depending on the condition. ifdef means "if the following is defined" while ifndef means "if the following is not defined".

So:

#define one 0
#ifdef one
    printf("one is defined ");
#endif
#ifndef one
    printf("one is not defined ");
#endif

is equivalent to:

printf("one is defined ");

since one is defined so the ifdef is true and the ifndef is false. It doesn't matter what it's defined as. A similar (better in my opinion) piece of code to that would be:

#define one 0
#ifdef one
    printf("one is defined ");
#else
    printf("one is not defined ");
#endif

since that specifies the intent more clearly in this particular situation.

In your particular case, the text after the ifdef is not removed since one is defined. The text after the ifndef is removed for the same reason. There will need to be two closing endif lines at some point and the first will cause lines to start being included again, as follows:

     #define one 0
+--- #ifdef one
|    printf("one is defined ");     // Everything in here is included.
| +- #ifndef one
| |  printf("one is not defined "); // Everything in here is excluded.
| |  :
| +- #endif
|    :                              // Everything in here is included again.
+--- #endif
share|improve this answer

Someone should mention that in the question there is a little trap. #ifdef will only check if the following symbol has been defined via #define or by command line, but its value (its substitution in fact) is irrelevant. You could even write

#define one

precompilers accept that. But if you use #if it's another thing.

#define one 0
#if one
    printf("one evaluates to a truth ");
#endif
#if !one
    printf("one does not evaluate to truth ");
#endif

will give one does not evaluate to truth. The keyword defined allows to get the desired behaviour.

#if defined(one) 

is therefore equivalent to #ifdef

The advantage of the #if construct is to allow a better handling of code paths, try to do something like that with the old #ifdef/#ifndef pair.

#if defined(ORA_PROC) || defined(__GNUC) && __GNUC_VERSION > 300
share|improve this answer
    
This is an important subtlety that often goes overlooked. –  Anthony Giorgio Sep 19 '10 at 20:26
1  
Not some precompilers. All. It's part of the standard. Please fix. –  R.. Sep 20 '10 at 0:37
    
done. I was not sure and hadn't the standard handy. And I remember having porting problems with that, but it was 20 years ago, so it might have been a non compliant compiler, as it was before ANSI C. –  Patrick Schlüter Sep 20 '10 at 6:25

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.