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Came across this one while browsing the response to another question on SO (References Vs Variable Gets). My question is that for all 64bit environments is it guaranteed that a reference to a variable will be of 64 bits even if the original had a lesser size? As in char references in 64bit environment would be >sizeof(char)? Is there any section in the standard which specifies this explicitly?

EDIT: For more clarity -- char c1 = 'a'; char& c2 = c1; My question is sizeof(c2) > sizeof(c1) in 64bit machines?

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Is your question "Do references require storage" ? Please be more precise. –  Prasoon Saurav Sep 19 '10 at 5:59
    
Yeah I'm not quite sure what exactly you're asking. Could you clarify? –  Sasha Chedygov Sep 19 '10 at 6:04
    
@Prasoon: Right, and more importantly how does it all fit in 64bit environment? If char& takes 8bytes and char takes 4 I might as well do everything by value if memory is a premium in my situation. –  Fanatic23 Sep 19 '10 at 6:23
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4 Answers

up vote 12 down vote accepted

The Standard (ISO C++-03) says the following thing about references

It is unspecified whether or not a reference requires storage (3.7).

Please someone correct me if I am wrong or if I have not understood his question correctly.

EDIT:

My question is sizeof(c2) > sizeof(c1) in 64bit machines?

No, as @Chubsdad noticed sizeof(c2) = sizeof (c1), the relevant quote from the Standard is

When applied to a reference or a reference type, the result is the size of the referenced type. (ISO C++ $5.3.3/2)

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This answers the last part of the question. People forget that there are lots of strange CPU architectures out there, even today in the supposedly modern age. –  slebetman Sep 19 '10 at 6:07
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No. sizeof(c2) is always sizeof(c1) as both c1 and c2 are of type 'char' which by definition is 1. –  Chubsdad Sep 19 '10 at 6:39
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@Chubsdad : sizeof(c1) is always 1, c2 is an alias of c1. So sizeof(c2) should be equal to 1. But you are overlooking the fact that a internally a reference may be implemented using a pointer. IMHO this is implementation defined to be pedantic. –  Prasoon Saurav Sep 19 '10 at 6:44
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Internal implementation mechanisms will never alter a visible behavior which is mandated by the Standard. Since c2 is an alias for c1 which is of type 'char', the sizeof(c2) should always be 1, no matter how it is implemented internally. –  Chubsdad Sep 19 '10 at 7:00
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$5.3.3/2 - 'When applied to a reference or a reference type, the result is the size of the referenced type.' –  Chubsdad Sep 19 '10 at 7:16
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Although sizeof(ref_var) returns the size of the referenced object, space is still required to store a reference in a structure, for instance, and in common implementations the space allocated to store a reference is the same as the space allocated to store a pointer. That may not be required by the standard, but this code at least shows the effect:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

char  c1 = 'a';
char &c2 = c1;
struct x
{
    char  c1;
    char  c2;
    char  c3;
    char  c4;
    int   i4a;
    char &r1; 
    int   i4b;
    int   i4c;
    x() : r1(c1) { }
};
struct y
{
    char  c1;
    char  c2;
    char  c3;
    char  c4;
    int   i4a;
    int   i4b;
    int   i4c;
};
int main()
{
    cout << sizeof(c2) << endl;
    cout << sizeof(y) << endl;
    cout << sizeof(x) << endl;
    return 0;
}

I make no pretense that it is 'great code' - it isn't - but it demonstrates a point. Compiled on MacOS X 10.6.4 with the C++ compiler from the GNU Compiler Collection (GCC 4.5.1) in default (64-bit) mode, the output is:

1
16
24

When compiled in 32-bit mode, the output is:

1
16
20

The first line of output demonstrates that 'sizeof(ref_var)' does indeed return the size of the referenced object. The second line shows that a structure with no reference in it has a size of 16 bytes. The third line shows that a very similar structure with a reference embedded in it at an 8-byte boundary (on a system where sizeof(int) == 4) is 8 bytes larger than the simpler structure under a 64-bit compilation and 4 bytes larger under a 32-bit compilation. By inference, the reference part of the structure occupies more than 4 bytes and not more than 8 bytes under the 64-bit compilation, and occupies not more than 4 bytes under the 32-bit compilation. This suggests that (in at least one popular implementation of C++) that a reference in a structure occupies the same amount of space as a pointer - as asserted in some of the other answers.

So, it may be implementation dependent, but the comment that a reference occupies the same space as a pointer holds true in at least one (rather widely used) implementation.

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+1 for the experiment.... :) –  Prasoon Saurav Sep 19 '10 at 9:36
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$8.3.2/3 - It is unspecified whether or not a reference requires storage.

sizeof applied to references is basically the size of the referrand.

So if 'r' is a integer reference to 'i', it is unspecified if there is an actual storage for 'r'. However sizeof(r) internally stands for sizeof(i).

If 'r' is a reference to a 'char', the sizeof(r) will be always sizeof(char) == 1 by definition.

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2  
...unless you're on an 8-bit system with maximum 256 bytes memory ;P –  Delan Azabani Sep 19 '10 at 6:10
1  
@Delan Azabani: sizeof(char) by definition is always 1 even if it takes 32 bits on an architecture. –  Chubsdad Sep 19 '10 at 6:37
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@Delan: Chubsdad is right. It's the CHAR_BITS constant that changes with the number of bits. sizeof(char) is defined to always be 1. –  sbi Sep 19 '10 at 7:07
    
I never actually said otherwise. I'm saying that references to char are 64 bits on a 64-bit system. char itself is 8 bits. –  Delan Azabani Sep 19 '10 at 7:09
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Yes. All references are the size of the architecture's width; on a 64-bit system, everything from char to long double references are 64 bits long.

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6  
I doubt this answer. references are not mandated to have any storage. sizeof(reference) is always the same as sizeof(referrand). If referrand is of type 'char' it is 1 e.g. –  Chubsdad Sep 19 '10 at 6:06
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