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BMP being Basic Multilingual Plane

According to JavaScript: the Good Parts:

JavaScript was built at a time when Unicode was a 16-bit character set, so all characters in JavaScript are 16 bits wide.

This leads me to believe that JavaScript uses UCS-2 (not UTF-16!) and can only handle characters up to U+FFFF.

Further investigation confirms this:

> String.fromCharCode(0x20001);

The fromCharCode method seems to only use the lowest 16 bits when returning the Unicode character. Trying to get U+20001 (CJK unified ideograph 20001) instead returns U+0001.

Question: is it at all possible to handle post-BMP characters in JavaScript?


2011-07-31: slide twelve from Unicode Support Shootout: The Good, The Bad, & the (mostly) Ugly covers issues related to this quite well:

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1  
If it were using UTF-16, then you would expect characters outside the basic multilingual plane to be supported using surrogate pairs. Why would you expect it to accept a 32-bit character? –  Michael Aaron Safyan Sep 19 '10 at 6:21
    
Thanks a lot for that, I never thought of it that way. –  Delan Azabani Sep 19 '10 at 6:54
1  
@MichaelAaronSafyan: Because JavaScript doesn't have anything resembling a "char" type and String.fromCharCode() returns a string it seems fair to expect it to return a string containing both code units that make up the character. I believe there will be a String.fromCodePoint() added to a future JavaScript standard to do exactly that. –  hippietrail May 30 '13 at 15:13
    
Your question explained why I would keep getting length === 1 after using String.fromCharCode –  Olga May 23 at 16:55

3 Answers 3

up vote 24 down vote accepted

Depends what you mean by ‘support’. You can certainly put non-UCS-2 characters in a JS string using surrogates, and browsers will display them if they can.

But, each item in a JS string is a separate UTF-16 code unit. There is no language-level support for handling full characters: all the standard String members (length, split, slice etc) all deal with code units not characters, so will quite happily split surrogate pairs or hold invalid surrogate sequences.

If you want surrogate-aware methods, I'm afraid you're going to have to start writing them yourself! For example:

String.prototype.getCodePointLength= function() {
    return this.length-this.split(/[\uD800-\uDBFF][\uDC00-\uDFFF]/g).length+1;
};

String.fromCodePoint= function() {
    var chars= Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments);
    for (var i= chars.length; i-->0;) {
        var n = chars[i]-0x10000;
        if (n>=0)
            chars.splice(i, 1, 0xD800+(n>>10), 0xDC00+(n&0x3FF));
    }
    return String.fromCharCode.apply(null, chars);
};
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Thank you very much. That's a great, detailed answer. –  Delan Azabani Sep 21 '10 at 10:33
    
@bobince So, technically, does JS use UCS-2 or UTF-16? UCS-2 doesn’t support characters outside the BMP, but JavaScript does if the individual surrogate halves are entered individually (e.g. '\uD834\uDD1E' for U+1D11E). But does that make it UTF-16? –  Mathias Bynens Jan 16 '12 at 15:20
3  
@Mathias: JavaScript is UTF-16-ignorant. It gives you a sequence of 16-bit code units and lets you put what you like in it. You can store surrogates in it if you want, but you won't get any special features to handle them as characters. Whether you want to describe that as ‘using’ UCS-2 or UTF-16 is a semantic argument to which there is not one definitive answer. However regardless of language-level support in JS, other parts of the browser do support surrogates for rendering/interation in the UI, so it makes some sense to include them in JS strings. –  bobince Jan 16 '12 at 19:36
2  
@bobince Thanks! I looked into it a bit further and have written up my findings here: mathiasbynens.be/notes/javascript-encoding Feedback welcome. –  Mathias Bynens Jan 20 '12 at 11:18
    
(Updated fromCodePoint to match the name proposed for ECMAScript 6's support for proper Unicode. This is now effectively a polyfill.) –  bobince Jan 28 at 14:20

I came to the same conclusion as bobince. If you want to work with strings containing unicode characters outside of the BMP, you have to reimplement javascript's String methods. This is because javascript counts characters as each 16-bit code value. Symbols outside of the BMP need two code values to be represented. You therefore run into a case where some symbols count as two characters and some count only as one.

I've reimplemented the following methods to treat each unicode code point as a single character: .length, .charCodeAt, .fromCharCode, .charAt, .indexOf, .lastIndexOf, .splice, and .split.

You can check it out on jsfiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/Y89Du/

Here's the code without comments. I tested it, but it may still have errors. Comments are welcome.

if (!String.prototype.ucLength) {
    String.prototype.ucLength = function() {
        // this solution was taken from 
        // http://stackoverflow.com/questions/3744721/javascript-strings-outside-of-the-bmp
        return this.length - this.split(/[\uD800-\uDBFF][\uDC00-\uDFFF]/g).length + 1;
    };
}

if (!String.prototype.codePointAt) {
    String.prototype.codePointAt = function (ucPos) {
        if (isNaN(ucPos)){
            ucPos = 0;
        }
        var str = String(this);
        var codePoint = null;
        var pairFound = false;
        var ucIndex = -1;
        var i = 0;  
        while (i < str.length){
            ucIndex += 1;
            var code = str.charCodeAt(i);
            var next = str.charCodeAt(i + 1);
            pairFound = (0xD800 <= code && code <= 0xDBFF && 0xDC00 <= next && next <= 0xDFFF);
            if (ucIndex == ucPos){
                codePoint = pairFound ? ((code - 0xD800) * 0x400) + (next - 0xDC00) + 0x10000 : code;
                break;
            } else{
                i += pairFound ? 2 : 1;
            }
        }
        return codePoint;
    };
}

if (!String.fromCodePoint) {
    String.fromCodePoint = function () {
        var strChars = [], codePoint, offset, codeValues, i;
        for (i = 0; i < arguments.length; ++i) {
            codePoint = arguments[i];
            offset = codePoint - 0x10000;
            if (codePoint > 0xFFFF){
                codeValues = [0xD800 + (offset >> 10), 0xDC00 + (offset & 0x3FF)];
            } else{
                codeValues = [codePoint];
            }
            strChars.push(String.fromCharCode.apply(null, codeValues));
        }
        return strChars.join("");
    };
}

if (!String.prototype.ucCharAt) {
    String.prototype.ucCharAt = function (ucIndex) {
        var str = String(this);
        var codePoint = str.codePointAt(ucIndex);
        var ucChar = String.fromCodePoint(codePoint);
        return ucChar;
    };
}

if (!String.prototype.ucIndexOf) {
    String.prototype.ucIndexOf = function (searchStr, ucStart) {
        if (isNaN(ucStart)){
            ucStart = 0;
        }
        if (ucStart < 0){
            ucStart = 0;
        }
        var str = String(this);
        var strUCLength = str.ucLength();
        searchStr = String(searchStr);
        var ucSearchLength = searchStr.ucLength();
        var i = ucStart;
        while (i < strUCLength){
            var ucSlice = str.ucSlice(i,i+ucSearchLength);
            if (ucSlice == searchStr){
                return i;
            }
            i++;
        }
        return -1;
    };
}

if (!String.prototype.ucLastIndexOf) {
    String.prototype.ucLastIndexOf = function (searchStr, ucStart) {
        var str = String(this);
        var strUCLength = str.ucLength();
        if (isNaN(ucStart)){
            ucStart = strUCLength - 1;
        }
        if (ucStart >= strUCLength){
            ucStart = strUCLength - 1;
        }
        searchStr = String(searchStr);
        var ucSearchLength = searchStr.ucLength();
        var i = ucStart;
        while (i >= 0){
            var ucSlice = str.ucSlice(i,i+ucSearchLength);
            if (ucSlice == searchStr){
                return i;
            }
            i--;
        }
        return -1;
    };
}

if (!String.prototype.ucSlice) {
    String.prototype.ucSlice = function (ucStart, ucStop) {
        var str = String(this);
        var strUCLength = str.ucLength();
        if (isNaN(ucStart)){
            ucStart = 0;
        }
        if (ucStart < 0){
            ucStart = strUCLength + ucStart;
            if (ucStart < 0){ ucStart = 0;}
        }
        if (typeof(ucStop) == 'undefined'){
            ucStop = strUCLength - 1;
        }
        if (ucStop < 0){
            ucStop = strUCLength + ucStop;
            if (ucStop < 0){ ucStop = 0;}
        }
        var ucChars = [];
        var i = ucStart;
        while (i < ucStop){
            ucChars.push(str.ucCharAt(i));
            i++;
        }
        return ucChars.join("");
    };
}

if (!String.prototype.ucSplit) {
    String.prototype.ucSplit = function (delimeter, limit) {
        var str = String(this);
        var strUCLength = str.ucLength();
        var ucChars = [];
        if (delimeter == ''){
            for (var i = 0; i < strUCLength; i++){
                ucChars.push(str.ucCharAt(i));
            }
            ucChars = ucChars.slice(0, 0 + limit);
        } else{
            ucChars = str.split(delimeter, limit);
        }
        return ucChars;
    };
}
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Thanks! Here is working with OS X emoji: jsfiddle.net/2vWfk –  forresto May 14 '13 at 8:03

Yes, you can. Although support to non-BMP characters directly in source documents is optional according to the ECMAScript standard, modern browsers let you use them. Naturally, the document encoding must be properly declared, and for most practical purposes you would need to use the UTF-8 encoding. Moreover, you need an editor that can handle UTF-8, and you need some input method(s); see e.g. my Full Unicode Input utility.

Using suitable tools and settings, you can write var foo = '𠀁'.

The non-BMP characters will be internally represented as surrogate pairs, so each non-BMP character counts as 2 in the string length.

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