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I'm trying to write a program that counts all the characters in a string. I originally had it, but then realized I can't count spaces. I can't see why this does not work.

for(m=0; z[m] != 0; m++) {
    if(z[m] != ' ') {
        charcount ++;
    }
}

Any assistance appreciated.

Edit* Does it make a difference if the input(strings) are being scanned in like this? And yes, everything is initialized. I've tried printing what z[m] evaluates too and it isn't the actual value of the string at "m", I think this is the problem.

for(j=0; j<7; j++){
    printf("Enter a string:\n");
    scanf("%s", z);
        for(m=0; z[m] != 0; m++){
                if(z[m] != ' '){
                charcount ++;
                }
        }
share|improve this question
2  
Did you initialize charcount to zero before the loop? –  pmg Sep 19 '10 at 12:29
    
That should indeed work, so does it not work (do you have an example ) And are you sure there's spaces in the text, and not e.g. tabs ? –  nos Sep 19 '10 at 12:29
    
To add to the confussion, please note that a character is different from a byte, and a character may take multiple bytes in a multibyte encoding (e.g: UTF-8) –  ninjalj Sep 19 '10 at 15:08
    
scanf itself skips spaces, so you don't need to if you use scanf. But your code has a serious bug in that it cannot ensure scanf does not write outside the bounds of z. You could use %10s (or whatever the length of z is, minus 1) instead of %s to fix that. –  R.. Sep 19 '10 at 16:17

4 Answers 4

You need to initialize charcount. Other than that, it should work, provided that z is a zero-terminated array of characters and m is an int or similar. I would probably write just z[m] rather than z[m] != 0 (since !0 = true and 0 = false), but both work. There are more efficient ways of doing it (although these days I bet a compiler will handle converting this into a pointer-based loop for you).

Here's a complete, correct example with minimal edits:

const char * z = "testing one two three";
int m;
int charcount;

charcount = 0;
for(m=0; z[m]; m++) {
    if(z[m] != ' ') {
        charcount ++;
    }
}

If you're using a String class of some kind rather than an old-fashioned C null-terminated array, you'll want to look at that class for how to loop through it.

All of the above also assumes you're dealing with ASCII strings. If you're dealing with UTF-encoded strings, you have to handle multi-byte characters.


Re your edit: It makes a big difference: scanf will stop on the first blank (I'd forgotten that). It might make an even bigger difference than that, though, if you're not declaring z correctly. (I'd also recommend using a field width when using scanf for reading strings [or avoiding scanf entirely]; otherwise, you have no control over the number of chars it will try to store, and so in theory, no buffer will ever be big enough to avoid an overflow. More here: http://www.crasseux.com/books/ctutorial/String-overflows-with-scanf.html)

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5  
'\0' and 0 are the same. One is not more correct than the other. One can, perhaps, be more stylish than the other. –  pmg Sep 19 '10 at 12:31
2  
@pmg: No, they're not. '\0' is a char, 0 is an int. It's a distinction that makes no difference in this code, though. –  T.J. Crowder Sep 19 '10 at 12:33
2  
Try this: sizeof '\0'. I don't think I've ever seen a literal char in C (except inside char[]). –  pmg Sep 19 '10 at 12:34
1  
This post is NOT tagged C++. I'd have made the distinction if it were. –  pmg Sep 19 '10 at 12:37
2  
@T.J.: C99, § 6.4.4.4 2: "An integer character constant is a sequence of one or more multibyte characters enclosed in single-quotes, as in 'x'." § 6.4.4.4 10: "An integer character constant has type int." –  outis Sep 19 '10 at 12:51

Instead of using scanf, try fgets like so:

char input[256];
fgets(input, sizeof(input), stdin);

fgets will read an entire line from a file. As such, passing stdin as the file handle will make it read from standard input, which in most cases will be bound to the console. One thing to watch out for, though, is that the string you get from fgets might include the newline character. Rather than explicitly checking your strings for inequality with the space character (' '), I suggest using the isspace function from ctype.h, which will check for various forms of whitespace (including a regular space and newline).

Here is a complete, runnable example:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <ctype.h>

int count_nonspace(const char* str)
{
 int count = 0;
 while(*str)
 {
  if(!isspace(*str++))
   count++;
 }
 return count;
}

int main()
{
 char input[256];
 fgets(input, sizeof(input), stdin);
 printf("%d\n", count_nonspace(input));
}
share|improve this answer

Yes, there is a difference on input-scan with scanf:

    scanf("%s", z);
...
                if(z[m] != ' '){

scanf("%s"...) always breaks at space-character, therefore your if ever is true. Better you use fgets to read from stdin,

#define MAXINPUT 80
char line[MAXINPUT];
for(j=0; j<7; j++) {
  printf("Enter a string:\n");
  if( fgets( line, 80, stdin ) )
  {
    char *c=line;
    if( strchr(line,'\n') ) *strchr(line,'\n')=0;
    while( *c )
    {
      if( *c!=' ' )
        ++charcount;
      ++c;
    }
  }
}

Or if you want WHITE -spaces then take

#include <ctype.h>
...
if( !isspace(*c) )
share|improve this answer

you can use strlen() http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/clibrary/cstring/strlen/

I'd suggest using a while loop, and to use more meaningful variablenames

m = textIndex z = text

something liek this

while (text[textIndex] != 0x00) { textIndex++; }

share|improve this answer
1  
How does strlen help him know how many non-space chars are in the string? –  T.J. Crowder Sep 19 '10 at 12:38
    
strlen() would be useful for me, except it seems to print out the length of each word individually rather than on one line. –  James Sep 19 '10 at 12:46
    
@TJ: scanf skips spaces itself already, and stops scanning when it reaches the next space. –  R.. Sep 19 '10 at 16:19
    
@James: As "R" says, that's because scanf stops on the first bit of whitespace, as I mentioned in my edited answer when you edited your question to say you were using scanf. –  T.J. Crowder Sep 19 '10 at 18:32
    
@R: As of Anonymous' answer and my comment, we didn't know scanf was involved. –  T.J. Crowder Sep 19 '10 at 18:32

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