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Hey, I have a question regarding code structure, and was wondering what the best practice is or if there was a specific design pattern I should be using.

I have an abstract base class BoundingVolume which can have subclasses such as BoundingSphere, BoundingBox, etc. A comparison has to be made between two BoundingVolumes to determine if they overlap, this comparison is made by a World class which keeps track of all objects in the simulation and is responsible for handling collisions between volumes.

My initial thought was that the World class would hold a collection of BoundingVolume objects, and call a virtual CollidesWith method defined on BoundingVolume which would accept another BoundingVolume to make the comparison with. The problem is the algorithm for determining if two BoundingVolumes overlap is different for each subclass, for example the algorithm for sphere collides with sphere is not the same as box collides with box, or box collides with sphere.

Using my initial plan each subclass would have to determine what the actual type of the BoundingVolume being passed to it was and make a switch to use the correct algorithm. Additionally each subclass would have to be extended every time a new subclass is added, effectively eliminating all benefit of having subclasses in the first place. Is there a better way to structure this?

I'm more looking for a solution to situations like this in general than an answer to this specific scenario.

Thanks for your help.

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Every problem can be solved with another layer of indirection. But is extensibility really that important for you? I can imagine a physics simulation is quite performance critical and you'll want to prefer raw speed over a nice extensible API. –  dtb Sep 19 '10 at 12:53
    
You're right performance may be more important in a physics simulation. However as I'm just working on this project in my own time for fun performance isn't as big an issue for me. I plan to add to the project over time starting simple and adding more features as I go, so I would like it to be relatively easy to extend at a later date. It may become the case further down the road when I'm happy with the overall feature set that performance becomes more important and I have to restructure for that. –  foggy Sep 19 '10 at 18:18
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3 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Is there a better way to structure this?

One solution here is to use double dispatch, which is where the target function is determined by the concrete types of two objects. In languages like C#, the default function call mechanism is single dispatch, i.e. the target function is just determined by the concrete type of a single object.

In languages like C# or C++, double dispatch is achievable through the visitor pattern. For example, in your case, this might look like the following:

interface BoundingVolume
{
    bool CollidesWith(BoundingVolume v);

    bool CollidesWith(BoundingBox b);
    bool CollidesWith(BoundingSphere s);
}

class BoundingBox : BoundingVolume
{
    public bool CollidesWith(BoundingVolume v)
    {
        return v.CollidesWith(this);
    }

    public bool CollidesWith(BoundingBox b)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("box/box");
        return true;
    }

    public bool CollidesWith(BoundingSphere s)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("box/sphere");
        return true;
    }
}

class BoundingSphere : BoundingVolume
{
    public bool CollidesWith(BoundingVolume v)
    {
        return v.CollidesWith(this);
    }

    public bool CollidesWith(BoundingBox b)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("sphere/box");
        return true;
    }

    public bool CollidesWith(BoundingSphere s)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("sphere/sphere");
        return true;
    }
}

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        BoundingVolume v1 = new BoundingBox();
        BoundingVolume v2 = new BoundingSphere();
        Console.WriteLine(v1.CollidesWith(v2));
    }
}

You could imagine that the box/sphere and sphere/box implementations just call out to a common collision utility function for detecting collisions between a sphere and a box.

Additionally each subclass would have to be extended every time a new subclass is added, effectively eliminating all benefit of having subclasses in the first place

Depending on what they do, the subclasses could still give you benefit through other polymorphic behavior, e.g. a ContainsPoint virtual method would return whether or not the specific BoundingVolume contained a Point.

Essentially, though, you can't avoid the combinatorial explosion if you have the need to special-case each type of collision since something somewhere will need to say "if I have an X and a Y, how do I compute their intersection efficiently?" This could be a big switch statement, a table of methods, or the double dispatch via visitor pattern mentioned above.

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I really like this approach and it certainly solves the problems I was having with my initial attempt. Thanks for taking the time to provide a code example as well. I'm going to mark this as the answer, though I realise the question was somewhat subjective. –  foggy Sep 19 '10 at 18:09
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This seems like a situation where a separate function sounds like the best solution. Make a function, which is a friend of the subclasses so it can acres it's members. To determine which subclasses are being passes to it, it can read a private/protected member function className().

That way, you just need to do a switch for all the possible combinations of bounding shapes. I would give each shape a number. This would be for a switch statement, and so that you can get the highest and lowest. This is to avoid formula repeats ( A==B = B==A ).

I hope I've made sense. I'm typing this on iPhone

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I see what your saying and it would certainly work. It may be interesting to compare this approach to the one given by Chris Schmich from a performance standpoint at a later date. I must admit the idea of introducing a member field to identify each subclass does feel somewhat "messy" to me, but that may be a case of me not seeing the forest through the trees. –  foggy Sep 19 '10 at 18:54
    
Code will inevitably feel messy, full of work-arounds, ect.... (especially when you are a perfectionist like me :) ) –  Alexander Rafferty Sep 20 '10 at 4:38
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Without knowing more, it sounds like you may be missing a level of abstraction.

In an ideal scenario, there would be a CollissionDetector that could take objects with just enough information to detect collisions. Now, presumably, the shapes of various objects can be quite different, as you've pointed out, but that's why you want that code separated out into a different class with nothing in it but overloaded methods or (even better). The overloads would recognize something like IBoundingBox, IEllipitcalBoundingBox, and so forth, and handle them from there.

You're right, though: this isn't something you want each box itself to know about. Eventually, you'll be wondering which box knows what, and you'll find that you've violated the principle of least knowledge.

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I think I follow you on this but the question becomes how does one get the correct overload to be called? The World class would only know of each IBoundingBox and IEllipticalBoundingBox by their base class, so at some point there would have to be a way to cast to the correct subtype so that its overload could be called. –  foggy Sep 19 '10 at 18:43
    
Ah, but that's the beauty of it. The abstract base class doesn't know. The concrete types do, and they provide the explicit implementation of the IBoundingBox or IEllipticalBoundingBox (or even I3DBoundingBox!) that's used by your CollisionDetector. The point is, the abstract base class should never know about its derivatives. Derivatives can know about their ancestors, tho, and so can coordinators. But coordinators should be as loosely coupled as possible. –  Mike Hofer Sep 20 '10 at 14:25
    
Going further: Consider a MovingVehicle class in your (theoretical) game world. It would derive from your MobileObject base class which simply has a marker interface (IMobileObject). Then, MovingVehicle provides a concrete implementation of I3DBoundingBox. The CollisionDetector provides a method, CollisionOccurred(IBoundingBox mob1, IBoundingBox mob2). Now, the IBoundingBox interface could be a base class for the IEllipticalBoundingBox and I3DBoundingBox interfaces, simplifying your life. –  Mike Hofer Sep 20 '10 at 14:29
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