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How do I check if a given object is nullable in other words how to implement the following method...

bool IsNullableValueType(object o)
{
    ...
}

EDIT: I am looking for nullable value types. I didn't have ref types in mind.

//Note: This is just a sample. The code has been simplified 
//to fit in a post.

public class BoolContainer
{
	bool? myBool = true;
}

var bc = new BoolContainer();

const BindingFlags bindingFlags = BindingFlags.Public
						| BindingFlags.NonPublic
						| BindingFlags.Instance
						;


object obj;
object o = (object)bc;

foreach (var fieldInfo in o.GetType().GetFields(bindingFlags))
{
	obj = (object)fieldInfo.GetValue(o);
}

obj now refers to an object of type bool (System.Boolean) with value equal to true. What I really wanted was an object of type Nullable<bool>

So now as a work around I decided to check if o is nullable and create a nullable wrapper around obj.

share|improve this question
    
Should the code include strings as being nullable? They are a non-generic ValueType which appears to be nullable. Or are they not a ValueType? –  TamusJRoyce May 2 '12 at 21:23
    
String is not a ValueType. It is a Reference type. –  Suncat2000 Mar 22 '13 at 13:09
    
@JonSkeet "basically the question wasn't clear enough about what the OP was trying to achieve" –  Kiquenet Nov 28 '13 at 13:43

11 Answers 11

up vote 133 down vote accepted

There are two types of nullable - Nullable<T> and reference-type.

Jon has corrected me that it is hard to get type if boxed, but you can with generics: - so how about below. This is actually testing type T, but using the obj parameter purely for generic type inference (to make it easy to call) - it would work almost identically without the obj param, though.

static bool IsNullable<T>(T obj)
{
    if (obj == null) return true; // obvious
    Type type = typeof(T);
    if (!type.IsValueType) return true; // ref-type
    if (Nullable.GetUnderlyingType(type) != null) return true; // Nullable<T>
    return false; // value-type
}

But this won't work so well if you have already boxed the value to an object variable.

share|improve this answer
6  
The last line is only valid if you somehow manage to get a boxed Nullable<T> instead of boxing straight to T. It's possible, but tricky to achieve from what I remember. –  Jon Skeet Dec 17 '08 at 14:22
    
Ah, you're right... –  Marc Gravell Dec 17 '08 at 14:24
3  
Thanks Nullable.GetUnderlyingType(type) != null is what I was looking for. –  Sandeep Datta Dec 17 '08 at 14:55
1  
@Abel if you mean re his edit to clarify that he hadn't considered reference types, I think my answer predated that edit; the reader can make their own decision there, based on their own needs, I suspect (confirmed: his comment re ref-types as added at 14:42; my answer was all <= 14:34) –  Marc Gravell Mar 10 '12 at 23:56
1  
Will (obj == null) throw an exception when obj = 1 ? –  Qi Fan Mar 27 '12 at 22:14

There is a very simple solution using method overloads

http://www.deanchalk.me.uk/post/Is-It-Nullable-.aspx

excerpt:

public static class ValueTypeHelper
{
    public static bool IsNullable<T>(T t) { return false; }
    public static bool IsNullable<T>(T? t) where T : struct { return true; }
}

then

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    int a = 123;
    int? b = null;
    object c = new object();
    object d = null;
    int? e = 456;
    var f = (int?)789;
    bool result1 = ValueTypeHelper.IsNullable(a); // false
    bool result2 = ValueTypeHelper.IsNullable(b); // true
    bool result3 = ValueTypeHelper.IsNullable(c); // false
    bool result4 = ValueTypeHelper.IsNullable(d); // false
    bool result5 = ValueTypeHelper.IsNullable(e); // true
    bool result6 = ValueTypeHelper.IsNullable(f); // true
share|improve this answer
4  
plus one for you sir for adding test cases. I've used those test cases for checking all the other answers. More people should go this extra bit. –  Martin Neal Jan 7 '11 at 21:06
3  
For what it's worth, this doesn't work in VB.NET. It results in a compiler error of "Overload resolution failed because no accessible 'IsNullable' is most specific for these arguments" in all situations where True would be returned. –  ckittel Aug 23 '11 at 18:39
1  
I really like this solution - and it is a shame VB cannot handle it. I tried working around with ValueType but ran into trouble with VB compiler being inconsistent about which overload to use based on whether it was called as a shared method or an extension, I even raised a question about this as it seems weird: stackoverflow.com/questions/12319591/… –  James Close Sep 7 '12 at 14:03
6  
You're checking the compile-time type, but it's already obvious (from intellisense) if the compile-time type is nullable (System.Nullable<>). If you say object g = e; and then ValueTypeHelper.IsNullable(g), what do you expect to obtain? –  Jeppe Stig Nielsen Dec 3 '12 at 14:36
4  
I just verified; this does not work, as Jeppe said. If the variables are cast to object, it will always return false. So you cannot determine the type of an unknown object at runtime this way. The only time this works is if the type is fixed at compile-time, and in that case you do not need a runtime check at all. –  HugoRune Jul 2 '13 at 13:59

The question of "How to check if a type is nullable?" is actually "How to check if a type is Nullable<>?", which can be generalized to "How to check if a type is a constructed type of some generic type?", so that it not only answers the question "Is Nullable<int> a Nullable<>?", but also "Is List<int> a List<>?".

Most of the provided solution use the Nullable.GetUnderlyingType() method, which will obviously only work with the case of Nullable<>. I did not see the general reflective solution that will work with any generic type, so I decided to add it here for posterity, even though this question has already been answered long ago.

To check if a type is some form of Nullable<> using reflection, you first have to convert your constructed generic type, for example Nullable<int>, into the generic type definition, Nullable<>. You can do that by using the GetGenericTypeDefinition() method of the Type class. You can then compare the resulting type to Nullable<>:

Type typeToTest = typeof(Nullable<int>);
bool isNullable = typeToTest.GetGenericTypeDefinition() == typeof(Nullable<>);
// isNullable == true

The same can be applied to any generic type:

Type typeToTest = typeof(List<int>);
bool isList = typeToTest.GetGenericTypeDefinition() == typeof(List<>);
// isList == true

Several types may seem the same, but a different number of type arguments means it's a completely different type.

Type typeToTest = typeof(Action<DateTime, float>);
bool isAction1 = typeToTest.GetGenericTypeDefinition() == typeof(Action<>);
bool isAction2 = typeToTest.GetGenericTypeDefinition() == typeof(Action<,>);
bool isAction3 = typeToTest.GetGenericTypeDefinition() == typeof(Action<,,>);
// isAction1 == false
// isAction2 == true
// isAction3 == false

Since Type object are instantiated once per type, you can check for reference equality between them. So if you want to check if two objects are of the same generic type definition, you can write:

var listOfInts = new List<int>();
var listOfStrings = new List<string>();

bool areSameGenericType =
    listOfInts.GetType().GetGenericTypeDefinition() ==
    listOfStrings.GetType().GetGenericTypeDefinition();
// areSameGenericType == true

If you'd like to check if an object is nullable, rather than a Type, then you can use the above technique together with Marc Gravell's solution to create a rather simple method:

static bool IsNullable<T>(T obj)
{
    if (!typeof(T).IsGenericType)
        return false;

    return typeof(T).GetGenericTypeDefinition() == typeof(Nullable<>);
}
share|improve this answer

Well, you could use:

return !(o is ValueType);

... but an object itself isn't nullable or otherwise - a type is. How were you planning on using this?

share|improve this answer
1  
This threw me off a bit. e.g. int? i = 5; typeof(i) returns System.Int32 instead of Nullable<Int32> -- typeof(int?) returns Nullable<Int32>.. where can I get some clarity on this topic? –  Gishu Feb 12 '09 at 11:39
1  
typeof(i) will give a compiler error- you can't use typeof with a variable. What did you actually do? –  Jon Skeet Feb 12 '09 at 11:47
    
:) As i said.. i am all shook up. I did i.GetType() –  Gishu Feb 12 '09 at 11:54
12  
i.GetType() will box to Object first, and there's no such thing as a boxed nullable type - Nullable<int> gets boxed to a null reference or a boxed int. –  Jon Skeet Feb 12 '09 at 14:52
    
thanks.. got the missing piece. –  Gishu Feb 12 '09 at 15:05

The simplest way I can figure out is:

public bool IsNullable(object obj)
{
    Type t = obj.GetType();
    return t.IsGenericType 
        && t.GetGenericTypeDefinition() == typeof(Nullable<>);
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1. Excellent solution for boxed null-able types. I haven't tested this specifically yet. So if anyone else can verify, it would be appreciated. –  TamusJRoyce May 2 '12 at 21:20
    
I have already tested it. I had to created a kind of Nullable type, but with different semantics. In my situation I should support null as a valid value and also support no value at all. So a created an Optional type. As it was necessary to support null values, I also had to implement code for handling Nullable values as part of my implementation. That is where this code came from. –  Carlos Loth May 8 '12 at 13:52
3  
I think this solution is wrong. Passing a Nullable value type as an argument to a method expecting a parameter of type object should cause boxing to occur. Nullable is a value type and the result of boxing conversion is a reference type. There are no boxed nullables. I believe this method always returns false? –  Mishax Nov 17 '12 at 8:34
    
Any test about it like another answers ? –  Kiquenet Nov 28 '13 at 13:36
1  
It doesn't work because of boxing value. It will always return FALSE. –  N Rocking Apr 4 at 16:21

There are two issues here: 1) testing to see whether a Type is nullable; and 2) testing to see whether an object represents a nullable Type.

For issue 1 (testing a Type), here's a solution I've used in my own systems: TypeIsNullable-check solution

For issue 2 (testing an object), Dean Chalk's solution above works for value types, but it doesn't work for reference types, since using the <T> overload always returns false. Since reference types are inherently nullable, testing a reference type should always return true. Please see the note [About "nullability"] below for an explanation of these semantics. Thus, here's my modification to Dean's approach:

    public static bool IsObjectNullable<T>(T obj)
    {
        // If the parameter-Type is a reference type, or if the parameter is null, then the object is always nullable
        if (!typeof(T).IsValueType || obj == null)
            return true;

        // Since the object passed is a ValueType, and it is not null, it cannot be a nullable object
        return false; 
    }

    public static bool IsObjectNullable<T>(T? obj) where T : struct
    {
        // Always return true, since the object-type passed is guaranteed by the compiler to always be nullable
        return true;
    }

And here's my modification to the client-test code for the above solution:

    int a = 123;
    int? b = null;
    object c = new object();
    object d = null;
    int? e = 456;
    var f = (int?)789;
    string g = "something";

    bool isnullable = IsObjectNullable(a); // false 
    isnullable = IsObjectNullable(b); // true 
    isnullable = IsObjectNullable(c); // true 
    isnullable = IsObjectNullable(d); // true 
    isnullable = IsObjectNullable(e); // true 
    isnullable = IsObjectNullable(f); // true 
    isnullable = IsObjectNullable(g); // true

The reason I've modified Dean's approach in IsObjectNullable<T>(T t) is that his original approach always returned false for a reference type. Since a method like IsObjectNullable should be able to handle reference-type values and since all reference types are inherently nullable, then if either a reference type or a null is passed, the method should always return true.

The above two methods could be replaced with the following single method and achieve the same output:

    public static bool IsObjectNullable<T>(T obj)
    {
        Type argType = typeof(T);
        if (!argType.IsValueType || obj == null)
            return true;
        return argType.IsGenericType && argType.GetGenericTypeDefinition() == typeof(Nullable<>);
    }

However, the problem with this last, single-method approach is that performance suffers when a Nullable<T> parameter is used. It takes much more processor time to execute the last line of this single method than it does to allow the compiler to choose the second method overload shown previously when a Nullable<T>-type parameter is used in the IsObjectNullable call. Therefore, the optimum solution is to use the two-method approach illustrated here.

CAVEAT: This method works reliably only if called using the original object reference or an exact copy, as shown in the examples. However, if a nullable object is boxed to another Type (such as object, etc.) instead of remaining in its original Nullable<> form, this method will not work reliably. If the code calling this method is not using the original, unboxed object reference or an exact copy, it cannot reliably determine the object's nullability using this method.

In most coding scenarios, to determine nullability one must instead rely on testing the original object's Type, not its reference (e.g., code must have access to the object's original Type to determine nullability). In these more common cases, IsTypeNullable (see link) is a reliable method of determining nullability.

P.S. - About "nullability"

I should repeat a statement about nullability I made in a separate post, which applies directly to properly addressing this topic. That is, I believe the focus of the discussion here should not be how to check to see if an object is a generic Nullable type, but rather whether one can assign a value of null to an object of its type. In other words, I think we should be determining whether an object type is nullable, not whether it is Nullable. The difference is in semantics, namely the practical reasons for determining nullability, which is usually all that matters.

In a system using objects with types possibly unknown until run-time (web services, remote calls, databases, feeds, etc.), a common requirement is to determine whether a null can be assigned to the object, or whether the object might contain a null. Performing such operations on non-nullable types will likely produce errors, usually exceptions, which are very expensive both in terms of performance and coding requirements. To take the highly-preferred approach of proactively avoiding such problems, it is necessary to determine whether an object of an arbitrary Type is capable of containing a null; i.e., whether it is generally 'nullable'.

In a very practical and typical sense, nullability in .NET terms does not at all necessarily imply that an object's Type is a form of Nullable. In many cases in fact, objects have reference types, can contain a null value, and thus are all nullable; none of these have a Nullable type. Therefore, for practical purposes in most scenarios, testing should be done for the general concept of nullability, vs. the implementation-dependent concept of Nullable. So we should not be hung up by focusing solely on the .NET Nullable type but rather incorporate our understanding of its requirements and behavior in the process of focusing on the general, practical concept of nullability.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for "PS - About Nullability" –  Askolein Mar 27 at 16:08

Be carefull, when boxing a nullable type (Nullable<int> or int? for instance) :

int? nullValue = null;
object boxedNullValue = (object)nullValue;
Debug.Assert(boxedNullValue == null);

int? value = 10;
object boxedValue = (object)value;
Debug.Assert( boxedValue.GetType() == typeof(int))

It becomes a true reference type, so you lose the fact it was nullable.

share|improve this answer

This works for me and seems simple:

static bool IsNullable<T>(T obj)
{
    if (default(T) == null) 
    {
        return true;
    }
    else
    {
        return false;
    }
}
share|improve this answer

The answers on this thread are good.

I wanted to add my own way, which although kludgey is reliable and fast. Its reliability hinges on the GUID for Nullable type remaining constant - which I feel is safe. Here's the code:

    static readonly Guid GUID_Nullable = new Guid("(9a9177c7-cf5f-31ab-8495-96f58ac5df3a)");

    /// <summary>
    /// Reports whether type is the Nullable &lt;&gt; class
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="type"></param>
    /// <returns></returns>
    public static bool IsNullable(this Type type)
    {
        return type.GUID == GUID_Nullable;
    }

The pros and cons are obvious, but this has served me well for a long time

share|improve this answer
    
I don't have enough reputation to vote down, but I'd say this answer is not a valid solution? –  Werner Jul 5 '12 at 10:01
    
Maybe better is delete this answer –  Kiquenet Nov 28 '13 at 13:30
2  
Hey, this solution does work so why the downvotes? =( –  Malachi Dec 6 '13 at 17:13

Maybe a little bit off topic, but still some interesting information. I find a lot of people that use Nullable.GetUnderlyingType() != null to identity if a type is nullable. This obviously works, but Microsoft advices the following type.IsGenericType && type.GetGenericTypeDefinition() == typeof(Nullable<>) (see http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms366789.aspx).

I looked at this from a performance side of view. The conclusion of the test (one million attempts) below is that when a type is a nullable, the Microsoft option delivers the best performance.

Nullable.GetUnderlyingType(): 1335ms (3 times slower)

GetGenericTypeDefinition() == typeof(Nullable<>): 500ms

I know that we are talking about a small amount of time, but everybody loves to tweak the milliseconds :-)! So if you're boss wants you to reduce some milliseconds then this is your saviour...

/// <summary>Method for testing the performance of several options to determine if a type is     nullable</summary>
[TestMethod]
public void IdentityNullablePerformanceTest()
{
    int attempts = 1000000;

    Type nullableType = typeof(Nullable<int>);

    Stopwatch stopwatch = new Stopwatch();
    stopwatch.Start();
    for (int attemptIndex = 0; attemptIndex < attempts; attemptIndex++)
    {
        Assert.IsTrue(Nullable.GetUnderlyingType(nullableType) != null, "Expected to be a nullable"); 
    }

    Console.WriteLine("Nullable.GetUnderlyingType(): {0} ms", stopwatch.ElapsedMilliseconds);

    stopwatch.Restart();

    for (int attemptIndex = 0; attemptIndex < attempts; attemptIndex++)
   {
       Assert.IsTrue(nullableType.IsGenericType && nullableType.GetGenericTypeDefinition() == typeof(Nullable<>), "Expected to be a nullable");
   }

   Console.WriteLine("GetGenericTypeDefinition() == typeof(Nullable<>): {0} ms", stopwatch.ElapsedMilliseconds);
   stopwatch.Stop();
}
share|improve this answer
bool IsNullableValueType(object o)
{
    Type objType = o.GetType();

    if (objType.FullName.StartsWith(typeof(Nullable<>).FullName))
    {
        return Nullable.GetUnderlyingType(objType).IsValueType;
    }

    return false;
}
share|improve this answer
    
objType.FullName.StartsWith(typeof(Nullable<>).FullName)... What purpose does this serve? –  Sandeep Datta Nov 6 '09 at 16:16
    
To check if objTyoe is nullable. –  Drakiula Nov 17 '09 at 10:44
    
Thx for voting against, btw, anyone bothered to compile this code?What is wrong with it? –  Drakiula Nov 17 '09 at 10:47
1  
Yeah, I must say, after testing this code, this is an incorrect solution. not only does int? a = 123; IsNullableValueType(a) returns false, but int? a = null; IsNullableValueType(a) throws a NullReferenceException. –  Martin Neal Jan 7 '11 at 20:52
1  
Maybe delete this answer... –  Kiquenet Nov 28 '13 at 13:28

protected by Brian Mains Jul 10 at 17:17

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