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It has been a popular question that how to print hello world without using semicolon.I know many codes but this one sounds weird because I am unable to get the logic behind it.Please help me know how it prints.

if(printf("hello world")){}
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4  
Why the downvotes? –  Andres Jaan Tack Sep 19 '10 at 21:17
4  
"it has been a popular question that how to print hello world without using semicolon"; in the homework industry? –  Gregory Pakosz Sep 19 '10 at 21:23
3  
@fahad: Well, you have to explain which part of this statement you have problems understanding. For any person familiar with C, this statement is rather straightforward and obvious. For this reason, it is hard to answer your question, not knowing what specifically you are asking about. It's like if you asked "Why when I calculate 2+2 I get 4?". I wouldn't know how to even start answering it. –  AndreyT Sep 19 '10 at 21:35
5  
@AndreyT: with the Peano axioms ;-) –  Steve Jessop Sep 19 '10 at 21:49
13  
Tonight on StackOverflow: A person who writes sentences without commas asks about programming without semicolons. Film at 11. –  Mike DeSimone Sep 20 '10 at 3:05

7 Answers 7

up vote 28 down vote accepted

The bit about the semicolons is just a little "I'm smarter than you" misdirection.

However, when you get this you'll know something about c;

Here is a series of programs that may help. Compile and run each one, then think about what they do and how they differ from the ones that came before:

#include <stdio.h>
int main(int argc, char**argv){
  int i = printf("Hello, world!\n");
  printf("%d\n",i);
  return 0;
}

#include <stdio.h>
int main(int argc, char**argv){
  if ( 1 ) {
    printf("condition evaluated as true\n");
  } else {
    printf("condition evaluated as false\n");
  }
  return 0;
}

#include <stdio.h>
int main(int argc, char**argv){
  if ( printf("Hello, world!\n") ) {
    printf("condition evaluated as true\n");
  } else {
    printf("condition evaluated as false\n");
  }
  return 0;
}

#include <stdio.h>
int main(int argc, char**argv){
  if ( printf("Hello, world!\n") ) {
  }
  return 0;
}

Finally, you are allowed to omit the return from main (which implicitly returns 0 in that case). So you get:

#include <stdio.h>
int main(int argc, char**argv){
  if ( printf("Hello, world!\n") ) {
  }
}

which is a complete, standard compliant version of Hello, world! without any semicolons.

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2  
Well done, this is the right approach. Sadly, SO doesn't incentivate it, and I too tend to provide direct answers even to newbies who would need more a guidance. –  Matteo Italia Sep 19 '10 at 21:26
    
thank you buddy –  Fahad Uddin Sep 19 '10 at 21:37
5  
+1 for the step-by-step explanation. –  Péter Török Sep 19 '10 at 21:41
    
@dmckee: You should have explained, why he may leave out the return statement ;-) –  Jens Gustedt Sep 19 '10 at 21:58
    
@Jens: You are right. My first version didn't have them, then I added them for good style without even thinking about the problem at hand. D'oh! –  dmckee Sep 19 '10 at 22:15

You have to put a semicolon anyhow, just after the if statement, or you have to put an empty block after it.

if(printf("hello world"))
    ;

or

if(printf("hello world")) {}

EDIT: I was sure that in the question there wasn't the empty block... I must have read it wrong, or it has been ninja-edited.

It works because printf is a normal function, returning the number of characters printed (as you can clearly see from its documentation); the if statement obviously evaluates the expression, thus calling the function (which incidentally prints the string on the screen).

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printf() is a normal function that returns the numbers printed, so basically the code first calls printf() and then checks, whether its return values evaluates to true (i.e. more than 0 characters where outputted). This is the case for "hello world", however it does not matter, since the conditional block is empty anyway.

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Take a look at the docs:

int printf ( const char * format, ... );

Return Value

On success, the total number of characters written is returned. On failure, a negative number is returned.

So it returns 12 11 in the Hello World case and that number is interpreted as true value. Value of if test needs to be calculated to decide which code block to execute which means that printf() is called in the first place.

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how does the if statment prints it? it should just check wheather the condition is true or false which in this case is true and it should do nothing –  Fahad Uddin Sep 19 '10 at 21:27
    
The if statement doesn't print it--the printf() call does. In order to get the truth value of the condition (i.e. the return value of printf()), printf() must be called. –  Jonathan Grynspan Sep 19 '10 at 21:30
    
@fahad: You're close to getting it. How does the compiler check if the condition is true or false when the condition is a function and not just a number? –  dmckee Sep 19 '10 at 21:30
    
@dmckee: You mean to find the value of the condition it executes the function.But still why would it ever print it? –  Fahad Uddin Sep 19 '10 at 21:34
1  
Oh got it...! It evaluates the function and actually the evaluation prints it on the screen ..thanks a million. –  Fahad Uddin Sep 19 '10 at 21:37

Since the return type of printf is a number, and all the numbers are true which are not 0 and 0 is false, a number in an if statement can be evaluated. That's why the source code works. When you call a function in an evaluation the function must return the value before the evaluation happens, so printf does what it has to do, returns a number and the if evaluates it. That's what this source code does.

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Since the operation is in the condition it doesn't need a semicolon (that's why it works without a semicolon).

You're essentially passing as the condition to "if" the output from printf.

printf returns an integer, the total number of characters written, so if let's say printf writes out the 25 characters then it returns 25 and your "if" statement is doing something like this...

if( printf( "blahblahblah"/* 25 characters */ ) ){}

if( 25 ){}

if( TRUE == 25 ) 
{
  // do nothing
}

At the point when the "if" statement evaluates the condition, it executes whatever is in that condition. So when the "if" statement starts it's evaluation, printf gets executed, prints out the text and returns the number of characters to the "if" condition's check (the return value from printf). Then the "if" statement decides whether to run the TRUE or FALSE part. There is only an empty TRUE part, so it does nothing after having executed the printf statement and evaluated the return.

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why is there a need of {} at all ? –  Fahad Uddin Sep 19 '10 at 21:49
1  
@fahad: You don't need a {} block after an if(), but if you don't use it the statement that follows must end in a semicolon, which your fried has challenged you o avoid. –  dmckee Sep 19 '10 at 22:20
1  
I believe that TRUE == 25 would be evaluated to false, but it is pseudo code so I will forgive you ;-). –  tia Sep 20 '10 at 2:44

The if statement will simply check if the expression has evaluated to non-zero value. So

if (printf("Hello World")) { }

is pretty much the same is

if (printf("Hello World") != 0) { }

which printf needs to be called to evaluate the expression.

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