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Imagine this case where I have an object that I need to check a property. However, the object can currently have a null value.

How can I check these two conditions in a single "if" condition?

Currently, I have to do something like this:

if (myObject != null)
{
    if (myObject.Id != pId)
    {
        myObject.Id = pId;
        myObject.Order = pOrder;
    }
}

I would like something like this:

if (myObject != null && myObject.Id != pId)

I want to evaluate the second condition only if the first was true.

Maybe I'm missing something, and that's why I need your help ;-)

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Why does if (myObject != null && myObject.Id != pId) throw an Exception? I think it is exactly what you want! –  Carlos Heuberger Jan 12 '10 at 13:40
    
@Carlos Now it is fixed. –  Nelson Reis Jan 12 '10 at 20:26

10 Answers 10

up vote 43 down vote accepted
if(myObject != null && myObject.Id != pId)
{
   myObject.Id = pId;
   myObject.Order = pOrder;
}

&& is a short-circuiting logic test - it only evaluates the right-hand-side if the left-hand-side is true. Contrast to "a & b", which always evaluates both sides (and does a bitwise "and")

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Ok, but I don't want to throw any exception. I only wanted the second condition to be evaluated if the first was true. –  Nelson Reis Dec 17 '08 at 14:55
    
Refresh the page ;-p –  Marc Gravell Dec 17 '08 at 14:55
    
Nelson, the code does exactly that. If myObject is null the right part of the if will never be evaluated. –  Nils Pipenbrinck Dec 17 '08 at 14:56
    
I like that. Guess these are the things you miss when you don't formally learn a language... –  lc. Dec 17 '08 at 14:58
    
Yep... seems like it. Thanks a lot. That saved me a lot of trouble. I know a lot of C# programmers (like me) that don't know this... –  Nelson Reis Dec 17 '08 at 15:00

It should be stressed that the short-circuited evaluation of the && in the if() is absolutely guaranteed by the language standards (C, C++, Java and C#). It's been that way since the first edition of K&R's "C Programming Language".

It's not something that you have to worry "Does my compiler implement this?". If definitely does.

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Thanks, I didn't knew this short-circuited evaluation thing. Seems a little lame now, but its the truth. –  Nelson Reis Dec 17 '08 at 15:17
    
It's something a lot of people don't know about! And many who stumble upon it, think it's a compiler quirk. –  James Curran Dec 17 '08 at 16:14
if (myObject != null && myObject.Id != pId)
{
//bla
}

this is safe because operator && is evaluated lazily, meaning that if the LHS is false, the RHS is never evaluated

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I can say I've already learned something today. Thanks. –  Nelson Reis Dec 17 '08 at 15:07

This code will first check if myObject is not null, in the case that is true it will check the next condition, in the case that is not true it will not check the next condition and not execute the code.

if (myObject != null && myObject.Id != pId)
{
  myObject.Id = pId;
  myObject.Order = pOrder;
}
share|improve this answer

You've got lots of good answers on how to do it. I just want to put in a warning about how not to do it. Don't wrap the single test for id=pid in a try-catch block. It's wasteful and would involve the introduction of exception checking to catch a non-exceptional condition. It's such a bad idea that I'm not even going to illustrate it with an example.

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Yes, you're right. I wouldn't do that, anyways. First I would check the null value in myObject. –  Nelson Reis Dec 17 '08 at 15:03
if (myObject != null && myObject.Id != pId)
{
     myObject.Id = pId;
     myObject.Order = pOrder;
}
share|improve this answer
if(!(myObject == null || myObject.Id == pId))
{
   myObject.Id = pId;
   myObject.Order = pOrder;
}
share|improve this answer

Since I think it may be helpful to others looking at this question in the future. As stated, using && provides the functionality you want. But, it should also be noted, the functionality you were afraid, that both sides would be evaluated regardless of the result of the first evaluation can be gotten by using & instead of &&. So:

//DO NOT USE THIS CODE
//this will throw an exception if myObject is null
//because myOject.Id != pId will still be evaluated
if(myObject != null & myObject.Id != pId)
{   
   myObject.Id = pId;
   myObject.Order = pOrder;
}

Again, for this example, you DO NOT want this code. I simply wanted to add it to the conversation because there may be cases (though I've never found one) where this is the functionality you want, for example:

//always run both methods
if(MethodA() & MethodB())
{   
   //do stuff only when both methods return true
}
share|improve this answer
    
Good contribution. Thanks. –  Nelson Reis Dec 17 '08 at 22:43

I think that in VB.net you can use the andAlso keyword as an alternative to this behaviour. So something like...

if(myObject != null andAlso myObject.Id != pId)
  {
   myObject.Id = pId;
   myObject.Order = pOrder;
  }

Does exactly the same thing I think but its there as an alternative!

Edit: changed C# to VB.net above

share|improve this answer
    
C# doesn't have the andAlso keyword. Although, VB has it, and that was what I recalled, since I've started .NET with VB. But the answer is && operator. –  Nelson Reis Dec 17 '08 at 16:12
    
Whoops! Apologies for that. Edited post to reflect that fact –  chillysapien Dec 18 '08 at 13:57

You can use & to evaluate two conditions, but if you want to test the second only if the first element is true you can use &&.

In Portuguese we call this: "AND com curto circuito".

if (myObject != null && myObject.Id != pId)

if myObject is false you can't test myObject.Id because myObject is null and you can't access to a property of an null object.

:::::::::::::::::::::::

a b a && b

true true true

true false false

false true false

false false false

:::::::::::::::::::::::

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