Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Will the right side of the expression get evaluated first or the left ?

void main ()
{
    int i = 0 , a[3] ;
    a[i] = i++;
    printf ("%d",a[i]) ;
}
share|improve this question
1  
Oh! SO got so many questions of this type... – Nyan Sep 20 '10 at 0:11
    
@Nyan: It's a common pitfall. – James McNellis Sep 20 '10 at 4:57
    
@Nyan : Also read this answer. – Prasoon Saurav Sep 20 '10 at 5:12
    
So common that it's in c-faq... – Nyan Sep 20 '10 at 14:56
up vote 16 down vote accepted

The order of evaluation of the operands of the assignment operator is unspecified: the operands may be evaluated in any order.

However, this expression (a[i] = i++) yields undefined behavior because you both modify i (using i++) and you separately read i (using a[i]) without a sequence point in between those actions.

share|improve this answer
5  
@mahmoudsakr: No, that is incorrect. – James McNellis Sep 19 '10 at 22:35
    
@msakr, i would be incremented at the end if there was something like a[k] = i++ ;. As James McNellis said, it's undefined behavior for a[i] = i++; due to no sequence points between the actions. – Kizaru Sep 19 '10 at 22:39
    
@James: source? – kamasheto Sep 19 '10 at 22:42
2  
@msakr: C standard §6.5/2: "Between the previous and next sequence point an object shall have its stored value modified at most once by the evaluation of an expression. Furthermore, the prior value shall be read only to determine the value to be stored." – Jonathan Leffler Sep 19 '10 at 22:45
    
@msakr: Concerning the order of evaluation, see C99 Appendix J ("Unspecified Behavior"): "The order in which subexpressions are evaluated and the order in which side effects take place, except as specified for the function-call (), &&, ||, ?:, and comma operators." Jonathan gives the quote that states that this particular expression yields undefined behavior. – James McNellis Sep 19 '10 at 22:45

C does not define which side gets evaluated first. The standard states (C99 §6.5/2):

Between the previous and next sequence point an object shall have its stored value modified at most once by the evaluation of an expression. Furthermore, the prior value shall be accessed only to determine the value to be stored

The aforementioned result you posted is thereby UB.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.