Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Why must the line continuation character (_) be the last one on the line? Is there a technical reason for this or is this a usual Microsoft "feature"?

In other basic dialects you can add a comment after it, but not in VB.net, so I'm curious as to why Microsoft decided to not allow comments on these lines.

share|improve this question
1  
use vs 2010, line continuation is no longer required. Otherwise yes, its a lovely feature. –  BlackICE Sep 20 '10 at 2:25
    
I know its not required in 2010, but that doesn't really answer my question as to why Microsoft would do that. –  user389823 Sep 20 '10 at 2:38
3  
@David: Even in VS 2010, you cannot add a comment at the end of a continued line. –  Heinzi Sep 20 '10 at 9:15

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

It has to be baked into the compiler, because the disassembled code looks no different. Take a look at the following code:

    Dim nameVar As String = "John"
       MsgBox("Hello " & nameVar & _
              ". How are you?")

MSIL looks at it like this:

IL_0000: nop
IL_0001: ldstr "John"
IL_0006: stloc.1
IL_0007: ldstr "Hello "
IL_000c: ldloc.1
IL_000d: ldstr ". How are you\?"
IL_0012: call string [mscorlib]System.String::Concat(string,
string,
string)

Now the same code without line continuation:

        Dim nameVar As String = "John"
        MsgBox("Hello " & nameVar & ". How are you?")

MSIL is identical:

IL_0000: nop
IL_0001: ldstr "John"
IL_0006: stloc.1
IL_0007: ldstr "Hello "
IL_000c: ldloc.1
IL_000d: ldstr ". How are you\?"
IL_0012: call string [mscorlib]System.String::Concat(string,
string,
string)

So this is a "feature" of the compiler. Why do it this way? When explaining anything about VB.NET, you need to look back to classic Visual Basic. Many of the principals and procedures were simply just Grandfathered to VB.NET for a comfort level and to attract VB6 and earlier programmers. So why it is the way in VB.NET (2008 and before) is probably because it was that way in VB6 and earlier. And I would venture to guess it was done that way in VB6 because of IDE limitations prior to compiling the code, but we can never know that unless somebody from the original VB6 Microsoft team added thier reasoning behind it.

Hope this helps!

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the thorough answer! –  user389823 Sep 20 '10 at 19:44

One of the developers who works on Microsoft VB.Net has a blog post about this idea. He says it's a nice idea but requires some compiler refactoring.

If you think it should be prioritised, you could leave a comment on the blog. Or suggest something at Microsoft Connect.

share|improve this answer
    
Well that sort of answers it. The blog post says: "However, the current compiler architecture dates back from the days that VB was strictly line-oriented language so we’d have to refactor the compiler first" which is another way of saying that Microsoft hasn't updated the parser in a decade... –  user389823 Sep 20 '10 at 12:36
1  
To be fair, I'd be the first to complain if they were updating their parser for fun, rather than implementing useful new features in VB. BTW I think comments after line continuations would be useful, but I probably wouldn't pick them as a very high priority. –  MarkJ Sep 20 '10 at 13:54

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.