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I have an issue regarding conversion from float to c++ string using ostringstream. Here is my line:

void doSomething(float t)
{
    ostringstream stream; 
    stream << t;
    cout << stream.str();
}

when t has value -0.89999 it is round off to -0.9, but when it's value is 0.0999 or lesser than this say 1.754e-7, it just prints without round off. what can be the solution for this.

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Why don't you pass the float directly to cout? –  In silico Sep 20 '10 at 4:48
    
@In silico, actually i want to use that value at some point in my code. –  boom Sep 20 '10 at 4:50
    
@In silico, what actually you say does not work. –  boom Sep 20 '10 at 5:02
    
That's why it's a comment, not an answer. :-) I didn't know the cout is for debugging purposes. –  In silico Sep 20 '10 at 6:13

4 Answers 4

up vote 10 down vote accepted

You need to set the precision for ostringstream using precision

e.g

stream.precision(3);
stream<<fixed;    // for fixed point notation
//cout.precision(3); // display only
stream << t;

cout<<stream.str();
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i got solution for 0.0999, but for the number of 7.9e-08 i am still getting the same. so what can be the solution for this. –  boom Sep 20 '10 at 5:01
    
you need to set precision to the stream itself. i.e. stream.precision(3); –  yadab Sep 20 '10 at 5:11
    
i am doing the same. here is my code:ostringstream stream; stream.precision(1); stream << t; cout << endl<<"Value:"<< stream.str(); –  boom Sep 20 '10 at 5:20
    
okay, use a fixed precision. e.g, stream.precision(8); stream << fixed; stream << t; cout << endl<<"Value:"<< stream.str(); –  yadab Sep 20 '10 at 5:31
    
thanks it worked out. –  boom Sep 20 '10 at 5:45

If you want a particular number of significant figures displayed try using setprecision(n) where n is the number of significant figures you want.

#include <iomanip>

void doSomething(float t)
{
    ostringstream stream; 
    stream << std::setprecision(4)  << t;
    cout <<  stream.str();
}
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1  
Why would you want to set the precision when sending a string to cout... ? –  Georg Fritzsche Sep 20 '10 at 5:19
    
shuttle87, I fixed what I considered an obvious error. I hope you don't mind. –  sbi Sep 20 '10 at 5:40

If you want fixed-point instead of scientific notation, use std::fixed:

stream << std::fixed << t;

Additionally you might want to set the precision as mentioned.

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Use setprecision:

stream << setprecision(5) <<t ;

Now, your string stream.str() will be of the required precision.

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i got solution for 0.0999, but for the number of 7.9e-08 i am still getting the same. so what can be the solution for this. –  boom Sep 20 '10 at 5:03

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