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I have a very similar requirement specified here

I need to start download manually when $('a#someID').click();

But I cannot use window.href method, since it replaces the current page contents with the file you're trying to download.

Instead I want to open the download in new window/tab. How is this possible?

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1  
This thread should help –  letronje Sep 20 '10 at 7:11
    
Not really jQuery, but it's a possibility: gieson.com/Library/projects/utilities/opensave –  bob Aug 19 '12 at 9:25
    
Using anchor tag and PHP it can be done, Check this answer stackoverflow.com/questions/7578124/… –  hitesh Dec 30 '13 at 13:43

7 Answers 7

up vote 147 down vote accepted

Use this function:

var downloadURL = function downloadURL(url) {
    var hiddenIFrameID = 'hiddenDownloader',
        iframe = document.getElementById(hiddenIFrameID);
    if (iframe === null) {
        iframe = document.createElement('iframe');
        iframe.id = hiddenIFrameID;
        iframe.style.display = 'none';
        document.body.appendChild(iframe);
    }
    iframe.src = url;
};

The way it works is by creating an invisible iframe (only once) which can then be used to download files from the internet.

To force the browser to download a file it would otherwise be capable of rendering (such as HTML or text files), you need the server to set the file's MIME Type to a nonsensical value, such as application/x-please-download-me or alternatively application/octet-stream, which is used for arbitrary binary data.

If you only want to open it in a new tab, the only way to do this is for the user to a click on a link with its target attribute set to _blank.

In jQuery:

$('a#someID').attr({target: '_blank', 
                    href  : 'http://localhost/directory/file.pdf'});

Whenever that link is clicked, it will download the file in a new tab/window.

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This method is not showing the download prompt, instead it embedded the pdf file at the end of the page. Please see my comments in letronje's answer –  Mithun Sep 20 '10 at 7:38
2  
A webpage cannot open a new tab automatically. To force the browser to download, get the server to send the pdf file with a nonsense MIME-type, such as application/x-please-download-me –  Andrew Dunn Sep 20 '10 at 7:55
1  
how can I set it, MIME type? thanks! –  Jepser Bernardino Aug 24 '11 at 18:04
7  
Nicely done! Solves the problem well. However, you may want to use: iframe.style.display = 'none'; as this will completely hide the iframe. Your current implementation will make the iframe invisible, but the iframe will still take up space at bottom of the page causing extra white space. –  Akrikos Aug 7 '12 at 14:45
1  
It "semi" works for me. I created the following simple test html: <html><body><iframe src="fileurl"></iframe></body></html> and it does get downloaded, but in the chrome console I see that the download was "canceled" and appears in red. This is part of a larger mobile web app, and the fact that it gets canceled breaks the app because it raises a general web failure. Any way around this? –  Sagi Mann - TROPHiT Nov 21 '12 at 15:51

I have created the jQuery File Download plugin (Demo) (GitHub) which could also help with your situation. It works pretty similarly with an iframe but has some cool features that I have found quite handy:

  • Very easy to setup with nice visuals (jQuery UI Dialog, but not required), everything is tested too

  • User never leaves the same page they initiated a file download from. This feature is becoming crucial for modern web applications

  • successCallback and failCallback functions allow for you to be explicit about what the user sees in either situation

  • In conjunction with jQuery UI a developer can easily show a modal telling the user that a file download is occurring, disband the modal after the download starts or even inform the user in a friendly manner that an error has occurred. See the Demo for an example of this. Hope this helps someone!

Here is a simple use case demo using the plugin source with promises. The demo page includes many other, 'better UX' examples as well.

$.fileDownload('some/file.pdf')
    .done(function () { alert('File download a success!'); })
    .fail(function () { alert('File download failed!'); });
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The demo looks really nice, I haven't used it yet, but will soon. Any chance the code is on github? (so I can be notified of updates) –  Dusty J Mar 31 '12 at 18:42
    
Thanks! Currently it's only available on my blog since its only one JS file but that's a good idea. I'll look into that, in the mean time I will be posting any updates on the original blog post and changelog –  John Culviner Apr 2 '12 at 3:36
    
on github now github.com/johnculviner/jquery.fileDownload –  John Culviner Jul 19 '12 at 15:10
    
@JohnCulviner: can i send json data in your post method. I tried it out and failed. Can you give me sample –  saravanan Sep 11 '12 at 11:38
    
very nice plugin –  Nati Krisi Mar 18 at 18:17

If you are already using jQuery, you could take adventage of it to produce a smaller snippet
A jQuery version of Andrew's answer:

var $idown;  // Keep it outside of the function, so it's initialized once.
downloadURL : function(url) {
  if ($idown) {
    $idown.attr('src',url);
  } else {
    $idown = $('<iframe>', { id:'idown', src:url }).hide().appendTo('body');
  }
},
//... How to use it:
downloadURL('http://whatever.com/file.pdf');
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FYI, Someone suggested (via editing my post) to add $idown.attr('src', url); after creating the iframe for the first time. I dont' think is needed. It's already setting the 'src:url' in the creation step. –  corbacho Oct 14 '12 at 21:11
    
Also to comment that finally I didn't use this solution because IE 9 didn't like dynamically-created iframes pointing to http:// when you are inside a https web. I had to used "window.location.href", a solution that has some inconveniences too –  corbacho Oct 14 '12 at 21:27
    
the "if($idown)" part didn't work for me in the latest Chrome(24), but just creating an endless number of iframes did. Maybe because I wanted to download 12 things at the same time? –  nessur Nov 26 '12 at 1:27
1  
The if statement really should be: if( $idown && $idown.length > 0 ) –  iOnline247 Sep 5 '13 at 14:20
    
Does not do anything in Chrome –  PsychoDad Jul 15 at 4:38
function downloadURI(uri, name) 
{
    var link = document.createElement("a");
    link.download = name;
    link.href = uri;
    link.click();
}
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Using anchor tag and PHP it can be done, Check this answer

JQuery Ajax call for PDF file download

HTML
    <a href="www.example.com/download_file.php?file_source=example.pdf">Download pdf here</a>

PHP
<?php
$fullPath = $_GET['fileSource'];
if($fullPath) {
    $fsize = filesize($fullPath);
    $path_parts = pathinfo($fullPath);
    $ext = strtolower($path_parts["extension"]);
    switch ($ext) {
        case "pdf":
        header("Content-Disposition: attachment; filename=\"".$path_parts["basename"]."\""); // use 'attachment' to force a download
        header("Content-type: application/pdf"); // add here more headers for diff. extensions
        break;
        default;
        header("Content-type: application/octet-stream");
        header("Content-Disposition: filename=\"".$path_parts["basename"]."\"");
    }
    if($fsize) {//checking if file size exist
      header("Content-length: $fsize");
    }
    readfile($fullPath);
    exit;
}
?>

I am checking for file size because if you load pdf from CDN cloudfront, you won`t get the size of document which forces the document to download in 0kb, To avoid this i am checking with this condition

 if($fsize) {//checking if file size exist
      header("Content-length: $fsize");
    }
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The answer submitted by hitesh on Dec 30 '13 does in fact work. It just requires a little adjusting:

The PHP file can call itself. In other words, just create a file named saveAs.php, and put this code into it...

        <a href="saveAs.php?file_source=YourDataFile.pdf">Download pdf here</a>

    <?php
        if (isset($_GET['file_source'])) {
            $fullPath = $_GET['file_source'];
            if($fullPath) {
                $fsize = filesize($fullPath);
                $path_parts = pathinfo($fullPath);
                $ext = strtolower($path_parts["extension"]);
                switch ($ext) {
                    case "pdf":
                    header("Content-Disposition: attachment; filename=\"".$path_parts["basename"]."\""); // use 'attachment' to force a download
                    header("Content-type: application/pdf"); // add here more headers for diff. extensions
                    break;
                    default;
                    header("Content-type: application/octet-stream");
                    header("Content-Disposition: filename=\"".$path_parts["basename"]."\"");
                }
                if($fsize) {//checking if file size exist
                  header("Content-length: $fsize");
                }
                readfile($fullPath);
                exit;
            }
        }
    ?>
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These functions are used in stacktrace.js:

/**
 * Try XHR methods in order and store XHR factory.
 *
 * @return <Function> XHR function or equivalent
 */
var createXMLHTTPObject = function() {
    var xmlhttp, XMLHttpFactories = [
        function() {
            return new XMLHttpRequest();
        }, function() {
            return new ActiveXObject('Msxml2.XMLHTTP');
        }, function() {
            return new ActiveXObject('Msxml3.XMLHTTP');
        }, function() {
            return new ActiveXObject('Microsoft.XMLHTTP');
        }
    ];
    for (var i = 0; i < XMLHttpFactories.length; i++) {
        try {
            xmlhttp = XMLHttpFactories[i]();
            // Use memoization to cache the factory
            createXMLHTTPObject = XMLHttpFactories[i];
            return xmlhttp;
        } catch (e) {
        }
    }
}

/**
 * @return the text from a given URL
 */
function ajax(url) {
    var req = createXMLHTTPObject();
    if (req) {
        try {
            req.open('GET', url, false);
            req.send(null);
            return req.responseText;
        } catch (e) {
        }
    }
    return '';
}
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