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Let's say I have a system that must store how many people voted on fighter A and how many on fighter B.

Let's say ratio is 200:1

How can I store that value in a single variable, instead of storing both values (number of voters on A and number of voters on B) in two variables.

How you would do that?

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3  
Is the ratio always X:1, in that case no reason to save the last figure, only save X, or 200 in this case. If the last figure will be anything else than 1, please give an example. –  Øyvind Knobloch-Bråthen Sep 20 '10 at 9:21
    
A better question is why would you want to do that? What is wrong with storing it in two variables? I can think of plenty of reasons why you shouldn't do that... –  Goran Sep 20 '10 at 14:34
    
The ratio can be X:Y where X & Y can have any positive value and never zero. –  user333306 Sep 20 '10 at 14:39
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8 Answers 8

up vote 11 down vote accepted

From the way that the question is worded this might not be the answer you are looking for, but the easiest way is to use a struct:

struct Ratio
{
    public Ratio(int a, int b)
    {
        this.a = a;
        this.b = b;
    }

    public int a = 1;
    public int b = 1;
}

You will almost certainly want to use properties instead of fields and you will probably also want to overload == and !=, something like:

public static bool operator ==(Ratio x, Ratio y)
{
    if (x.b == 0 || y.b == 0)
        return x.a == y.a;
    // There is some debate on the most efficient / accurate way of doing the following
    // (see the comments), however you get the idea! :-)
    return (x.a * y.b) == (x.b / y.a);
}

public static bool operator !=(Ratio x, Ratio y)
{
    return !(x == y);
}

public override string ToString()
{
    return string.Format("{0}:{1}", this.a, this.b);
}
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1  
“parameters”? –  Timwi Sep 20 '10 at 9:31
2  
I assume that was probably meant to be properties... –  Chris Sep 20 '10 at 9:33
3  
Actually, for a reliable comparison (I mean == operator) you should use multiplication instead of integer division, i.e.: return (x.a * y.b) == (x.b * y.a); –  digEmAll Sep 20 '10 at 9:56
1  
The == operator has a bug in it. If x.a is 1, y.a is 2 and both b's are 3, the integer division will yield 0 for both ratios. –  JeremyP Sep 20 '10 at 10:20
    
@JeremyP: that's exaclty what I tried to point out, in my first comment ;) –  digEmAll Sep 20 '10 at 10:24
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A ratio is, by definition, the result of dividing two numbers. Therefore, just do that division and store the result in a double:

double ratio = (double)a/b;
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3  
A ratio is really not the result of diving two numbers... what about when the ratio is 1:0? –  Justin Sep 20 '10 at 9:32
    
If the ratio is 1:0, you can use an error code, such as -1 and you can use -2 as an error code for 0:0. However, there is another problem, because in programming (x / y) * y = x is not always true, because computers can't have a 100% precisity in number dividing. For example 1 / 3 = 0.333333333333333...333333333... in reality, but the computers don't store that precisely. For example the computer stores 0.333333. This way, (1 / 3) * 3 = 0.333333 * 3 = 0.999999 != 1. This is why we must consider division imprecise for a ratio even if we have an error code for 1/0 and 0/0. –  Lajos Arpad Sep 20 '10 at 9:43
3  
1:0 and 0:0 are not ratios. –  Timwi Sep 20 '10 at 9:45
1  
+1, Timwi. Still, a ratio holds more information than the result of the division. –  peterchen Sep 20 '10 at 9:49
    
It depends on what the ratio is being used for as to whether the precision of the calculation is likely to be a problem. For example if as well as storing the ratio (lets say 1/3) you are storing the number of voters (lets say 400) then when you are workign otu teh voters on each side you know its an integer so if you get voters of 100.00001 and 299.9999 or similar then you can jsut round without a problem. It really depends on the context of usage so its not for us to say whether it is sufficient or not. I'd personally think it was in most cases. –  Chris Sep 20 '10 at 9:57
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string ratio="200:1"; // simple :)

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Brillant! As a plus side - this can be saved in a single db column :) –  Goran Sep 20 '10 at 14:32
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You can use struct like this:

struct Ratio
{
    public void VoteA()
    {
        A++;
    }

    public void VoteB()
    {
        B++;
    }

    public int A { get; private set; }
    public int B { get; private set; }

    public override string ToString()
    {
        return A + ":" + B;
    }
}

It's enough to implement voting in case if you have only two options available. Otherwise you should implement constructor accepting number of options, data structure to store number of votes, methods for voting or index operator. If you need the ratio for some integral math applications you might want to implement GCD method.

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You could use an int32 and use the first 16 bits to store the first integer (200) and the last 16 to store the other integer (1)

This is only if you really have to, I think you should avoid such optimizations

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It think you need to do it in a string for a single variable

string s=string.Format("{0}:{1}", 3, 5);
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Array? int[] ratio = new int[2] is much slimmer than a whole struct/class for 2 variables. Though if you want to add helper methods to it, a struct is the way to go.

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2  
I wouldn't say that its much slimmer - the runtime memory is use the same with a struct. –  Justin Sep 20 '10 at 9:34
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In my opinion you can use doubles.

Ratio Number

1:200 1.200

200:1 200:1

0:1 0.1

1:0 1.0

0:0 0.0

It's easy to use.

firstNumber = (int)Number;
secondNumber = Number - firstNumber;
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1  
So 1:20 == 1:200? According to your suggestion both are stored as 1.2 –  Goran Sep 20 '10 at 14:32
    
Good point, you're right –  Lajos Arpad Sep 20 '10 at 15:19
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