Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I was just trying to code the following extension method:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;

namespace _4Testing
{
    static class ExtensionMethods
    {
        public static void AssignMe(this int me, int value)
        {
            me = value;
        }
    }
}

But it is not working, i mean, can I use an extension method to alter values from extended classes? I don't want to change void return type to int, just changing extended class value. Thanks in advance

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Your example uses int, which is a value type. Classes are reference types and behaves a bit differently in this case.

While you could make a method that takes another reference like AssignMe(this MyClass me, MyClass other), the method would work on a copy of the reference, so if you assign other to me it would only affect the local copy of the reference.

Also, keep in mind that extension methods are just static methods in disguise. I.e. they can only access public members of the extended types.

public sealed class Foo {
   public int PublicValue;
   private int PrivateValue;
}

public static class FooExtensions {
   public static void Bar(this Foo f) {
      f.PublicValue = 42;

      // Doesn't compile as the extension method doesn't have access to Foo's internals
      f.PrivateValue = 42; 
   }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Cool Brian! Let me now go back to my IDE to continue changing my code. –  Ramon Araujo Sep 20 '10 at 13:13

Ramon what you really need is a ref modifier on the first (i.e. int me ) parameter of the extension method, but C# does not allow ref modifier on parameters having 'this' modifiers.

[Update] No workaround should be possible for your particular case of an extension method for a value type. Here is the "reductio ad absurdum" that you are asking for if you are allowed to do what you want to do; consider the C# statement:
5.AssignMe(10);
... now what on earth do you think its suppose to do ? Are you trying to assign 10 to 5 ?? Operator overloading cannot help you either.

share|improve this answer
1  
So, my question was looking for a workaround, do you please have one? Thanks anyway –  Ramon Araujo Sep 20 '10 at 13:10
// a work around for extension to a wrapping reference type is following ....

using System;


static class Program
{

    static void Main(string[] args)
   {


    var me = new Integer { value = 5 };
    int y = 2;

    me.AssignMe(y);

    Console.WriteLine(me); // prints 2

    Console.ReadLine();
    }

    public static void AssignMe(this Integer me, int value)
    {

       me.value = value;
    }


}

   class Integer
   {


      public int value { get; set; }

      public Integer()
   {
       value = 0;
   }

   public override string ToString()
   {
       return value.ToString();
   }

   }
share|improve this answer
    
Good mumtaz! I implemented a similar solution at the end. –  Ramon Araujo Sep 21 '10 at 15:17

This is an old post but I ran into a similar problem trying to implement an extender for the String class.

My original code was this:

public static void Revert(this string s)
{
   char[] xc = s.ToCharArray();
   s = new string(xc.Reverse());
}

By using the new keyword I am creating a new object and since s is not passed by reference it will not be modified.

I changed it to the following which provides a solution to Ramon's problem:

public static string Reverse(this string s)
{
  char[] xc = s.ToCharArray();
  Array.Reverse(xc);
  return new string(xc);
}

In which case the calling code will be:

s = s.Reverse();

To manipulate integers you can do something like:

public static int Increment(this int i)
{
  return i++;
}

i = i.Increment();
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.