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var length = new System.IO.FileInfo(path).Length;

This gives the logical size of the file, not the size on the disk.

I wish to get the size of a file on the disk in C# (preferably without interop) as would be reported by Windows Explorer.

Should give the correct size including for:

  • Compressed file
  • Sparse file
  • Fragmented file
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5 Answers 5

up vote 32 down vote accepted

This uses GetCompressedFileSize, as ho1 suggested, as well as GetDiskFreeSpace, as PaulStack suggested, it does, however, use P/Invoke. I have tested it only for compressed files, and I suspect it does not work for fragmented files.

    public static long GetFileSizeOnDisk(string file)
    {
        FileInfo info = new FileInfo(file);
        uint dummy, sectorsPerCluster, bytesPerSector;
        int result = GetDiskFreeSpaceW(info.Directory.Root.FullName, out sectorsPerCluster, out bytesPerSector, out dummy, out dummy);
        if (result == 0) throw new Win32Exception();
        uint clusterSize = sectorsPerCluster * bytesPerSector;
        uint hosize;
        uint losize = GetCompressedFileSizeW(file, out hosize);
        long size;
        size = (long)hosize << 32 | losize;
        return ((size + clusterSize - 1) / clusterSize) * clusterSize;
    }

    [DllImport("kernel32.dll")]
    static extern uint GetCompressedFileSizeW([In, MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.LPWStr)] string lpFileName,
       [Out, MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.U4)] out uint lpFileSizeHigh);

    [DllImport("kernel32.dll", SetLastError = true, PreserveSig = true)]
    static extern int GetDiskFreeSpaceW([In, MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.LPWStr)] string lpRootPathName,
       out uint lpSectorsPerCluster, out uint lpBytesPerSector, out uint lpNumberOfFreeClusters,
       out uint lpTotalNumberOfClusters);
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are you sure this is correct if (result == 0) throw new Win32Exception(result); –  Simon Aug 30 '11 at 6:21
    
The 'if (result == 0)' bit is correct (see msdn), but you're right that I am using the wrong constructor. I will fix it now. –  margnus1 Sep 1 '11 at 19:54
    
FileInfo.Directory.Root doesn't look as if it could handle any kind of filesystem links. So it only works on classic local drive letters with no symlinks/hardlinks/junction points or whatever NTFS has to offer. –  LonelyPixel Aug 24 '13 at 18:11
    
Could any one please give step by step explanation, what has been done at different steps? It will be very helpful to understand, how it actually works.Thanks. –  bapi Nov 13 '13 at 12:31
    
This code requires the namespaces System.ComponentModel and System.Runtime.InteropServices. –  Kenny Evitt Aug 16 at 22:35

The code above does not work properly on Windows Server 2008 or 2008 R2 or Windows 7 and Vista based systems as cluster size is always zero (GetDiskFreeSpaceW and GetDiskFreeSpace return -1 even with UAC disabled.) Here is the modified code that works.

C#

public static long GetFileSizeOnDisk(string file)
{
    FileInfo info = new FileInfo(file);
    uint clusterSize;
    using(var searcher = new ManagementObjectSearcher("select BlockSize,NumberOfBlocks from Win32_Volume WHERE DriveLetter = '" + info.Directory.Root.FullName.TrimEnd('\\') + "'") {
        clusterSize = (uint)(((ManagementObject)(searcher.Get().First()))["BlockSize"]);
    }
    uint hosize;
    uint losize = GetCompressedFileSizeW(file, out hosize);
    long size;
    size = (long)hosize << 32 | losize;
    return ((size + clusterSize - 1) / clusterSize) * clusterSize;
}

[DllImport("kernel32.dll")]
static extern uint GetCompressedFileSizeW([In, MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.LPWStr)] string lpFileName,
   [Out, MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.U4)] out uint lpFileSizeHigh);

VB.Net

  Private Function GetFileSizeOnDisk(file As String) As Decimal
        Dim info As New FileInfo(file)
        Dim blockSize As UInt64 = 0
        Dim clusterSize As UInteger
        Dim searcher As New ManagementObjectSearcher("select BlockSize,NumberOfBlocks from Win32_Volume WHERE DriveLetter = '" + info.Directory.Root.FullName.TrimEnd("\") + "'")

        For Each vi As ManagementObject In searcher.[Get]()
            blockSize = vi("BlockSize")
            Exit For
        Next
        searcher.Dispose()
        clusterSize = blockSize
        Dim hosize As UInteger
        Dim losize As UInteger = GetCompressedFileSizeW(file, hosize)
        Dim size As Long
        size = CLng(hosize) << 32 Or losize
        Dim bytes As Decimal = ((size + clusterSize - 1) / clusterSize) * clusterSize

        Return CDec(bytes) / 1024
    End Function

    <DllImport("kernel32.dll")> _
    Private Shared Function GetCompressedFileSizeW(<[In](), MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.LPWStr)> lpFileName As String, <Out(), MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.U4)> lpFileSizeHigh As UInteger) As UInteger
    End Function
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1  
Crack version (fully working)? –  Norbert Jul 29 '11 at 5:07
    
Yeah .. Lolz... –  Steve Johnson Jul 29 '11 at 5:12
    
System.Managment reference is required for this code to work. It appears as if there is no standard way of getting cluster size accurately on Windows (6.x versions) except WMI. :| –  Steve Johnson Jul 29 '11 at 5:14
1  
I wrote my code on a Vista x64 machine and now tested it on a W7 x64 machine in 64-bit and WOW64 mode. Note that GetDiskFreeSpace is supposed to return nonzero on success. –  margnus1 Sep 1 '11 at 20:23
1  
Original question asks for C# –  Shane Courtrille Jan 21 '13 at 20:27

according to MSDN social forums

"The size on disk should be the sum of the size of the clusters that store the file: long sizeondisk = clustersize * ((filelength + clustersize - 1) / clustersize);

You'll need to dip into P/Invoke to find the cluster size; GetDiskFreeSpace() returns it."

http://social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/Vsexpressvcs/thread/85bf76ac-a254-41d4-a3d7-e7803c8d9bc3

but please note the point that this will not work in NTFS where compressed is switched on

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1  
I suggest using something like GetCompressedFileSize rather than filelength to account for compressed and/or sparse files. –  ho1 Sep 20 '10 at 11:06

I think it will be like this:

double ifileLength = (finfo.Length / 1048576); //return file size in MB ....

I'm still doing some testing for this, to get a confirmation.

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This works just fine for me. Thanks a LOT! –  bassbytesbikes Mar 13 at 11:13

I don't get correct results using the above mentioned formula.

I'm using

size = CLng(Math.Ceiling(file.Length / blockSize) * blockSize)

instead and it gives me always the same result as shown in windows explorer.

And btw. you should always check if the file is compressed or not. If it is, you'll already get the correct size on disk from the api.

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