Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am a newbie to django, so the question might be dumb, but please feel free to teach me the right way if you know it. I tried googling the issue, but I am still at loss. Here's my problem:

I have a class in my model that has two foreign keys:

class X(models.Model):
    name = models.CharField(max_length=30)
    def __unicode__(self):
        return name

class Y(models.Model):
    name = models.CharField(max_length=30)
    def __unicode__(self):
        return name

class Z(models.Model):
    name = models.CharField(max_length=30)
    x = models.ForeignKey(X)
    y = models.ForeignKey(Y)
    def __unicode__(self):
        return name

In my view I get a partial list of X objects and a partial list of Y objects like so:

def MyView(x_pattern, y_pattern):
    x_list = X.objects.filter(name__contains=x_pattern)
    y_list = Y.objects.filter(name__contains=y_pattern)
    z_list = Z.objects.all()
    return render_to_response({'x_list': x_list, 'y_list': y_list, 'z_list': z_list})

In my template I'd like to be able to display a table like so:

<table>
  <tr>
   <td>Y</td>
   {% for x in x_list %}
    <td>{{ x }}</td>
   {% endfor %}
  </tr>
  {% for y in y_list %}
   <tr>
    <td>{{ y }}</td>
    {% for x in x_list %}
     <td>
      <!-- here I need help: 
           I need to display z[x, y] if it exists, or "N/A" otherwise.
      -->
     </td>
    {% endfor %}
   </tr>
  {% endfor %}

How do I do this properly in django?

Thank you very much,

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

As @DZPM suggested, you should think of keeping the logic in your view. [sheepish] I once invented my own "Table" data structure to do something very similar. The table was had rows corresponding to X, columns corresponding to Y and cells corresponding to Z[X, Y]. I then wrote get_row and get_cell filters to do the trick in the template. [/sheepish]

That said, what you want can be accomplished using a pair of custom filters. This solution is rather verbose.

@register.filter
def x_is(value, x):
    return value.x == x

@register.filter
def y_is(value, y):
    return value.y == y

You can use these filters in the template as shown below:

{% if z|x_is:x and z|y_is:y %}
    {{ z }}
{% else %}
    N/A
{% endif %}
share|improve this answer
    
Bingo! Thank you very much - that was the missing link (custom filters). –  mfynf Sep 20 '10 at 12:54

You should keep the logic in your view. Why don't you just filter the z_list there?

z_list = Z.objects.filter(x__name__contains=x_pattern, y__name__contains=y_pattern)
share|improve this answer
    
I can filter the list in the view, yet it still does not help me display it properly (i.e. I need to map (x,y) key pair to z[x,y] value in the template in order to display it in a proper table cell). Am I missing something here? –  mfynf Sep 20 '10 at 12:10

Another approach would be to create a generator in your view, and then send it to your template context:

# nested inside your view function
def x_and_z_list(y):
    for x in x_list:
        z_obj = x.z_set.filter(y=y)
        z_name = z_obj or 'N/A'
        yield {'x': x, 'z': z_name}
return render_to_response('mytemplate', {'list_generator': x_and_z_list}

Then your template could look like this:

{% for y in y_list %}
    <tr>
        <td>{{ y }}</td>
        {% for pair in list_generator.y %}  {# pair is the dict you yielded before #}
            <td>{{ pair.x.name }}: {{ pair.z }}</td>
        {% endfor %}
    </tr>
{% endfor %}
share|improve this answer

I combined the concepts of custom filter and functions as first class objects making a template filter into a functor (function-object).

Here is what I ended up doing:

def z_filter(x, y):
    z_list = list(Z.objects.filter(x, y))
    return z_list.pop().name or 'N/A'
register.filter(z_filter)

In template:

{% load z_filter %}
<table>
 <tr>
  <td>Y</td>
  {% for x in x_list %}
   <td>{{ x }}</td>
  {% endfor %}
 </tr>
 {% for y in y_list %}
  <tr>
   <td>{{ y }}</td>
    {% for x in x_list %}
     <td>{{ x|z_filter:y }}</td>
    {% endfor %}
   </tr>
 {% endfor %}
</table>

Thanks everybody for your help!

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.