Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

Why does the following code not work?

It compiles fine but output is something like an address if I write f using * and the output is 0 if I write f without *.

#include <iostream>
#include<cstring>
using namespace std;
using std::size_t;
int *f(size_t s){
    int *ret=new int[s];
     for (size_t a=0;a<s;a++)
          ret[a]=a;
      return ret;
      }
int main(){

    size_t s=20;
    cout<<*f(s)<<endl;

    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
Please post the code. –  Shamim Hafiz Sep 20 '10 at 12:07
    
What should it be doing? –  sje397 Sep 20 '10 at 12:10
10  
You have already asked a dozen questions here and still don't know how to format code? What keeps you from heading the hints beside the edit box? –  sbi Sep 20 '10 at 12:11
    
Why do you think this isn't working? From what I can see, it should be working just fine. –  sbi Sep 20 '10 at 12:15
    
...and, of course the code you posted has a heap memory leak (since you never delete[]) , but I suspect that is the least of your concerns. –  Mike Ellery Sep 20 '10 at 18:37

7 Answers 7

You're using C++, simply use std::vector instead, it simplifies everything :

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>

std::vector<int> f(size_t s){
    std::vector<int> ret( s );
     for (std::size_t a=0;a<s;a++)
          ret[a]=a;
      return ret;
      }
int main(){

    std::size_t s = 20;
    std::vector<int> v = f(s);
    for( std::vector<int>::iterator it = v.begin(); it != v.end(); ++it ) // go through each element
        std::cout<< *it << std::endl;

    for( int idx = 0; idx != v.size(); ++idx ) // simpler variant that is equivalent in this example
        std::cout<< v[idx] << std::endl;


    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
This misses a few std:: prefixes. Nevertheless, +1 from me. This is the only sane option for newbies. –  sbi Sep 20 '10 at 12:20
    
Ah yes, forgot to fix this after copy-pasting the code from the question...should be fixed now. –  Klaim Sep 20 '10 at 12:51
    
+1 from me as well, however, many times it is a requirement of a homework assignment to not touch standard containers - speaking from experience. –  Samaursa Sep 20 '10 at 14:25
    
I didn't assume it was a homework, only thought the asker was searching a way to return "arrays" from functions. –  Klaim Sep 20 '10 at 14:46

The function f(s) returns the address of the dynamically allocated array.

If you do cout<<f(s)<<endl; it will print that address and if you do cout<<*f(s)<<endl; it prints the value at index 0 which is 0.

If you want to print the entire array, run a loop as:

int *p = f(s);
for (size_t a=0;a<s;a++) {
    cout<<*(p+a)<<endl;
}
share|improve this answer

f(s) returns an int* so *f(s) is an int (the 1st item of the allocated array) with the value of 0. That's what it should appear, just a 0

share|improve this answer

As @frag says, main() knows nothing about the type of f(s) except that it is a pointer to int. It doesn't have any reason to look for 19 other ints.

Your main function should look more like this:

int main(){

    size_t s=20;
    int *p = f(s);
    for (size_t i=0; i<s; i++)
      cout<<*(p+i)<<endl;

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

It is easier to understand it when the code is separated into 2 lines:

int* ret = f(s);
cout<<*ret<<endl;

*ret == ret[0] == 0. Because of that it prints 0 for the code you posted.

*Note that you are allocating an array (using new) but never deallocating it.

If your intention is to print all the elements in the array, you can use the following code:

size_t s=20; 
int* ret = f(s);
for (size_t i = 0; i < s; i++)
    cout<< ret[i] << " ";
delete[] ret;
share|improve this answer
2  
delete ret is invoking undefined behavior, it should be delete[] ret. –  fredoverflow Sep 20 '10 at 15:20
    
Thank you. Fixed the answer accordingly. –  rursw1 Sep 20 '10 at 15:32

The best way to get an array out of a function is by giving a reference to it as an input argument (i.e. pass in a pointer to the start of the array), then once your function is complete, the array you passed in will have been populated by the function. I wouldn't advise even trying to return one.

An alternative is something like the STL Vector (http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/stl/vector/) class or similar variants, which can be returned, but it really depends on what you intend to use it for.

share|improve this answer
    
That's a dynamically allocated array. The code should work fine the way it is. –  sbi Sep 20 '10 at 12:15
    
I was always taught it was bad practice to return an array created in a function. That just seems a bit messy. –  n00dle Sep 20 '10 at 12:17
    
Ahh, I see what you mean now. OK, yeah, upvoting codaddict. –  n00dle Sep 20 '10 at 12:19

You can't use the << operator to output an array. You have to create a for loop and print each entry.

Save the output of f to a variable and print each entry.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.