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I plan to delete data from a table, i would like to know how many and which tables have a foreign key reference to this particular table in Oracle. As i will have to set the foreign keys to null. I would like to know list of all tables which have a FK to this particular table.

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possible duplicate of Oracle all foreign key references –  Tony Andrews Sep 20 '10 at 13:36
    

3 Answers 3

up vote 10 down vote accepted
select d.table_name,

       d.constraint_name "Primary Constraint Name",

       b.constraint_name "Referenced Constraint Name"

from user_constraints d,

     (select c.constraint_name,

             c.r_constraint_name,

             c.table_name

      from user_constraints c 

      where table_name='EMPLOYEES' --your table name instead of EMPLOYEES

      and constraint_type='R') b

where d.constraint_name=b.r_constraint_name
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I believe that should be, "Referencing Constraint Name", as that is the name of the constraint that references the primary constraint, not the other way around. –  jpmc26 Jun 3 '14 at 17:51

I have a situation where the table I'm interested in isn't owned by the schema I was connecting as. So I needed to modify the query in the currently accepted answer to use ALL_CONSTRAINTS instead of USER_CONSTRAINTS. In the process, I made a mistake, and I found the accepted answer to be very difficult to read so that I could fix it. (The lack of explanation didn't help.) As a result, I ended up coming up with my own query. It's basically the same, but I think it's a bit easier to grok.

SELECT FK.TABLE_NAME AS CHILD_TABLE
     , SRC.TABLE_NAME AS PARENT_TABLE
     , FK.CONSTRAINT_NAME AS FK_CONSTRAINT
     , SRC.CONSTRAINT_NAME AS REFERENCED_CONSTRAINT
FROM ALL_CONSTRAINTS FK
JOIN ALL_CONSTRAINTS SRC ON FK.R_CONSTRAINT_NAME = SRC.CONSTRAINT_NAME
WHERE FK.CONSTRAINT_TYPE = 'R'
  AND SRC.OWNER = 'MY_SCHEMA'
  AND SRC.TABLE_NAME = 'MY_TABLE';

FK.CONSTRAINT_TYPE = 'R' filters down FK to a set of foreign key constraints, and the join pairs these foreign keys up with their "Referenced constraint". (The referenced constraint is usually the primary key of the "parent" table.) Finally, we filter down to the parent table we're interested in using SRC.OWNER = 'MY_SCHEMA' AND SRC.TABLE_NAME = 'MY_TABLE'.

Naturally, you can switch this to use USER_CONSTRAINTS if you wish; just remove the SRC.OWNER check.

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There is no need to do this step manually - you can just use a cascading delete.

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You need to first find the table whose FK needs updated to permit cascase delete though –  Brian Jan 27 '11 at 16:20

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