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If I have a class that includes a file with a constant like so:

define("FOO", "bar");

Is there a way to make the class include the file with encapsulation so if I use the class somewhere that already has a FOO constant defined it won't break?

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What should happen if the constant is already defined? If the constant's name really is this generic, the fact that it is defined doesn't guarantee that it's another version of the same class... –  Piskvor Sep 20 '10 at 14:08
1  
if your at the stage in your application where you don't know what's defined and what is not then you should rethink your architecture IMO –  RobertPitt Sep 20 '10 at 14:32

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Create a static class and use constants would be the best way to encapsulate specific constants:

static class Constants
{
    const Name = 'foo';
    const Path = 'Bar';
}

And then use like so:

echo Constants::Name; //foo
echo Constants::Path; //bar

in regards to the precheck you can do

function _defined($key,$check_classes = false)
{
    if($check_classes)
    {
        foreach(get_declared_classes() as $class)
        {
            if(constant($class . '::' . $key) !== null)
            {
                return true;
            }
        }
    }
    if(!defined($key)) //global Scope
    {
        return true;
    }
}

Usage:

class a
{
    const bar = 'foo';
}

if(_defined('bar',true)) //This would be true because its within a
{
    //Blah
}

If your thinking of a situation like so

class a
{
    const b = '?';
}
class b
{
    const b = '?';
}

the constants are within the class scope so they would have no affect on one another !

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You can use a class contant

class Foo
{
    constant FOO = 'bar'
}

However, you will have to include the class before you can use the constant with Foo::FOO. An alternative with regular constants is to use to prefix them with a vendor prefix to make clashes less likely, e.g.

define('JOHN_FOO', 'bar')

or use the newly introduced namespaces (PHP 5.3)

define('JohnIsaacks\FOO', 'bar');

But in all cases, I wonder why you would need that. If you want to load classes, simply add in an autoloader.

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1  
or just require_once –  RobertPitt Sep 20 '10 at 14:28
    
@Robert Sure, but that wouldnt help with contant clashing, just with classes of the same name. –  Gordon Sep 20 '10 at 14:39

You can check if constant already defined using defined:

<?php
define("FOO", "1");
if (!defined("FOO")) { ## check if constant is not defined yet
    define("FOO", "2");
}
echo FOO;
?>
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