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I have been using Java's ConcurrentMap for a map that can be used from multiple threads. The putIfAbsent is a great method and is much easier to read/write than using standard map operations. I have some code that looks like this:

ConcurrentMap<String, Set<X>> map = new ConcurrentHashMap<String, Set<X>>();

// ...

map.putIfAbsent(name, new HashSet<X>());
map.get(name).add(Y);

Readability wise this is great but it does require creating a new HashSet every time even if it is already in the map. I could write this:

if (!map.containsKey(name)) {
    map.putIfAbsent(name, new HashSet<X>());
}
map.get(name).add(Y);

With this change it loses a bit of readability but does not need to create the HashSet every time. Which is better in this case? I tend to side with the first one since it is more readable. The second would perform better and may be more correct. Maybe there is a better way to do this than either of these.

What is the best practice for using a putIfAbsent in this manner?

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2  
In your example, the Value-HashSet would need to be a ConcurrentHashSet too, else this is still not threadsafe. –  Markus Kull Sep 20 '10 at 14:17
1  
Tom Hawtin's solution is exactly what youre looking for –  John Vint Sep 20 '10 at 14:20
1  
As pointed out by Markus, the value type (the Set in this case) does need to be also thread-safe, as it may be accessed by multiple threads concurrently. –  sjlee Sep 21 '10 at 5:47
    
Even if you use Tom Hawtin's response, which is incomplete and I believe to be equivalent to your own suggestion. –  petersaints May 9 '13 at 16:50

5 Answers 5

up vote 71 down vote accepted

Concurrency is hard. If you are going to bother with concurrent maps instead of straightforward locking, you might as well go for it. Indeed, don't do lookups more than necessary.

Set<X> set = map.get(name);
if (set == null) {
    final Set<X> value = new HashSet<X>();
    set = map.putIfAbsent(name, value);
    if (set == null) {
        set = value;
    }
}

(Usual stackoverflow disclaimer: Off the top of my head. Not tested. Not compiled. Etc.)

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13  
+1 for "concurrency is hard" and using the returnvalue of putIfAbsent –  Markus Kull Sep 20 '10 at 14:19
    
@Markus - +1 to you as well for pointing out the obvious, yet easy to ignore fact that reusing the returnvalue is a good practice. –  Drupad Panchal Jun 9 '11 at 4:35
1  
Good answer. Reminds me of double-checked locking: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Double-checked_locking –  Mansoor Siddiqui Oct 4 '12 at 20:41
    
I've been back to this answer more than once. :P –  Stu Thompson Nov 1 '12 at 7:50
1  
@zerkms That can happen, and the second if (set == null) handles that with the first thread through winning. The situation is unlikely, and the extra allocation time is unlikely to be significant. You could insert a temporary value in order to give a single thread exclusive access, but that's likely to make general performance and reliability worse. –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Apr 2 '13 at 11:53

Tom's answer is correct as far as API usage goes for ConcurrentMap. An alternative that avoids using putIfAbsent is to use the computing map from the GoogleCollections/Guava MapMaker which auto-populates the values with a supplied function and handles all the thread-safety for you. It actually only creates one value per key and if the create function is expensive, other threads asking getting the same key will block until the value becomes available.

Edit from Guava 11, MapMaker is deprecated and being replaced with the Cache/LocalCache/CacheBuilder stuff. This is a little more complicated in its usage but basically isomorphic.

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I just tried this and it is a great solution. You get all the benefits of ConcurrentMap without having to worry about the putIfAbsent idioms, which are easy to mess up. –  Matt Friedman Jul 18 '12 at 17:38

You can use MutableMap.getIfAbsentPut(K, Function0<? extends V>) from GS Collections.

The advantage over calling get(), doing a null check, and then calling putIfAbsent() is that we'll only compute the key's hashCode once, and find the right spot in the hashtable once. In ConcurrentMaps like com.gs.collections.impl.map.mutable.ConcurrentHashMap, the implementation of getIfAbsentPut() is also thread-safe and atomic.

import com.gs.collections.impl.map.mutable.ConcurrentHashMap;
...
ConcurrentHashMap<String, MyObject> map = new ConcurrentHashMap<>();
map.getIfAbsentPut("key", () -> someExpensiveComputation());

The implementation of com.gs.collections.impl.map.mutable.ConcurrentHashMap is truly non-blocking. While every effort is made not to call the factory function unnecessarily, there's still a chance it will be called more than once during contention.

This fact sets it apart from Java 8's ConcurrentHashMap.computeIfAbsent(K, Function<? super K,? extends V>). The Javadoc for this method states:

The entire method invocation is performed atomically, so the function is applied at most once per key. Some attempted update operations on this map by other threads may be blocked while computation is in progress, so the computation should be short and simple...

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2  
I like this a lot. I asked this question years ago but with Java 8 this is a really nice solution. –  Chris Dail Jul 10 at 18:26

By keeping a pre-initialized value for each thread you can improve on the accepted answer:

Set<X> initial = new HashSet<X>();
...
Set<X> set = map.putIfAbsent(name, initial);
if (set == null) {
    set = initial;
    initial = new HashSet<X>();
}
set.add(Y);

I recently used this with AtomicInteger map values rather than Set.

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My generic approximation:

public class ConcurrentHashMapWithInit<K, V> extends ConcurrentHashMap<K, V> {
  private static final long serialVersionUID = 42L;

  public V initIfAbsent(final K key) {
    V value = get(key);
    if (value == null) {
      value = initialValue();
      final V x = putIfAbsent(key, value);
      value = (x != null) ? x : value;
    }
    return value;
  }

  protected V initialValue() {
    return null;
  }
}

And as example of use:

public static void main(final String[] args) throws Throwable {
  ConcurrentHashMapWithInit<String, HashSet<String>> map = 
        new ConcurrentHashMapWithInit<String, HashSet<String>>() {
    private static final long serialVersionUID = 42L;

    @Override
    protected HashSet<String> initialValue() {
      return new HashSet<String>();
    }
  };
  map.initIfAbsent("s1").add("chao");
  map.initIfAbsent("s2").add("bye");
  System.out.println(map.toString());
}
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