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The following is the code snipplet regarding my doubt.

Class A{

void m1(A a){
   System.out.println("A");
}

}

Class B{

void m1(B a){
   System.out.println("B");
}

}

Class C{

void m1(C a){
   System.out.println("C");
}

}

class DMD{

public static void main(String args[]){
    A ac = new C();
    C c = new C();
    ac.m1(c);    
}
}

Output: A

But I excepted the output as: C Because I have created the memory for C and A is refering to C's memory so, if i call the method on the A ref which is pointing to C and the argument is i passed as C type so, I am expecting the m1(C) should execute.

Any body can please give me the proper reason for this Behaviour.

Thanks in advance.......!

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7  
What you have can't compile since C doesn't extend A. – Kirk Woll Sep 20 '10 at 14:35
    
This has nothing to do with regular expressions btw – sepp2k Sep 20 '10 at 14:40
1  
Duplicate (if you adjust for coding errors) of stackoverflow.com/questions/321864/… – Robin Sep 20 '10 at 14:58

Method invocations on methods taking distinct argument types (overloading) are realized at compile time. (And this is your case)

If all 3 methods accepted argument of type A - i.e. method overriding was present, only then polymorphism would come into play and would trigger the method of C provided there is a inheritance relationship between A and C i.e. C extends A.

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The decision which method to use, basically has two phases: First overload resolution, then method dispatch. Overload resolution happens at compile-time, method dispatch at runtime.

In this example the overload resolution decides that the overload m1(A a) should be used because that's the only overload of m1 that's defined on class A (and the static type of ac is A).

At runtime it is decided which implementation of m1(A a) to use, but since there is only one implementation (C.m1(C a) does not override m1(A a) as C a is more specific than A a), A.m1(A a) is chosen.

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Your code as written will not successfully compile. You cannot say "A ac=new C();" because C does not extend A. If you claim to have run this and gotten output, you must have mis-copied something from your running code into this post.

If, for the sake of argument, your code really said "A ac=new A();", then your code still wouldn't run, because A.m1 takes an A, not a C. The statement "ac.m1(c)" executes the function A.m1. "ac" is of type A, so executing any function against ac will get the function of that name from class A. Trying to pass a parameter of type C to a function declared to take a parameter of type A will not "switch" you to using a function from a different class that does take such a parameter. Overloading only works within a class.

Perhaps what you're thinking of is an example more like this:

class A
{
  public void m1(A a)
  {
    System.out.println("A");
  }
  public void m1(B b)
  {
    System.out.println("B");
  }
}
class Dmd
{
  public static void main(String[] args)
  {
    A a=new A();
    B b=new B();
    a.m1(b);
  }
}

This will output "B".

The difference here is that the class A has two versions of the function m1. One of them takes an A, one takes a B. When we call it with a B, we get the B version.

Do you see how this is different from your example? You are declaring three classes each with a function m1. Here we have one class with two functions both named m1. That's very different in Java.

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