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I'm trying to read some BigDecimal values from the string. Let's say I have this String: "1,000,000,000.999999999999999" and I want to get a BigDecimal out of it. What is the way to do it?

First of all, I don't like the solutions using string replaces (replacing commas etc.). I think there should be some neat formatter to do that job for me.

I've found a DecimalFormatter class, however as it operates through double - huge amounts of precision are lost.

So, how can I do it?

Thanks in advance.

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1  
Why no String.replaceAll? –  TofuBeer Sep 20 '10 at 14:52
    
Because given some custom format it is a pain to make it convert your format into BigDecimal-compatible format. –  Max Sep 20 '10 at 14:53
1  
"Because given some custom format it is a pain..." I dunno, it kind of separates problem domains. First you clean the human-readable stuff out of the string, then hand off to something that knows how to correctly and efficiently turn the result into a BigDecimal. –  T.J. Crowder Sep 20 '10 at 14:56

6 Answers 6

up vote 34 down vote accepted

Check out setParseBigDecimal in DecimalFormat. With this setter, parse will return a BigDecimal for you.

share|improve this answer
    
Constructor in the BigDecimal class does not support custom formats. The example I gave in the question uses the custom format (commas). You can't parse that to BigDecimal using it's constructor. –  Max Sep 20 '10 at 14:56
11  
If you're going to completely change your answer, I'd suggest mentioning it in the answer. Else it looks very odd when people have pointed out why your original answer didn't make any sense. :-) –  T.J. Crowder Sep 20 '10 at 15:03
    
Yeah, did not notice that method. Thanks, that seems to be the best way to do it. Gonna test it now and if it works properly - accept the answer. –  Max Sep 20 '10 at 15:03
    
I repaired the links and replaces 1.5 versions with 1.6 ones. +1, however –  Sean Patrick Floyd Sep 20 '10 at 15:31
    
your links are dead... –  Stu Thompson Nov 27 '11 at 20:24
String value = "1,000,000,000.999999999999999";
BigDecimal money = new BigDecimal(value.replaceAll(",", ""));
System.out.println(money);

Full code to prove that no NumberFormatException is thrown:

/**
 * 
 */

import java.math.BigDecimal;

/**
 * @author The Elite Gentleman
 *
 */
public class Tester {

    /**
     * @param args
     */
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        // TODO Auto-generated method stub
        String value = "1,000,000,000.999999999999999";
        BigDecimal money = new BigDecimal(value.replaceAll(",", ""));
        System.out.println(money);
    }
}

Output

1000000000.999999999999999

share|improve this answer
    
This throws java.lang.NumberFormatException –  Steve McLeod Sep 20 '10 at 14:58
    
@Steve McLeod....nope, I just tested it.... my value is 1000000000.999999999999999 –  Buhake Sindi Sep 20 '10 at 15:09
5  
Try with GERMAN locale, and 1.000.000.000,999999999999 –  TofuBeer Sep 20 '10 at 15:16
    
@#TofuBeer....the example was 1,000,000,000.999999999999999. If I had to do your locale, I would have to replace all dots to space.... –  Buhake Sindi Sep 20 '10 at 15:34
5  
So, it's not safe. You don't know all locales. –  ymajoros Jan 23 at 12:22

The following sample code works well (locale need to be obtained dynamically)

import java.math.BigDecimal;
import java.text.NumberFormat;
import java.text.DecimalFormat;
import java.text.ParsePosition;
import java.util.Locale;

class TestBigDecimal {
    public static void main(String[] args) {

        String str = "0,00";
        Locale in_ID = new Locale("in","ID");
        //Locale in_ID = new Locale("en","US");

        DecimalFormat nf = (DecimalFormat)NumberFormat.getInstance(in_ID);
        nf.setParseBigDecimal(true);

        BigDecimal bd = (BigDecimal)nf.parse(str, new ParsePosition(0));

        System.out.println("bd value : " + bd);
    }
}
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The code could be cleaner, but this seems to do the trick for different locales.

import java.math.BigDecimal;
import java.text.DecimalFormatSymbols;
import java.util.Locale;


public class Main
{
    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        final BigDecimal numberA;
        final BigDecimal numberB;

        numberA = stringToBigDecimal("1,000,000,000.999999999999999", Locale.CANADA);
        numberB = stringToBigDecimal("1.000.000.000,999999999999999", Locale.GERMANY);
        System.out.println(numberA);
        System.out.println(numberB);
    }

    private static BigDecimal stringToBigDecimal(final String formattedString,
                                                 final Locale locale)
    {
        final DecimalFormatSymbols symbols;
        final char                 groupSeparatorChar;
        final String               groupSeparator;
        final char                 decimalSeparatorChar;
        final String               decimalSeparator;
        String                     fixedString;
        final BigDecimal           number;

        symbols              = new DecimalFormatSymbols(locale);
        groupSeparatorChar   = symbols.getGroupingSeparator();
        decimalSeparatorChar = symbols.getDecimalSeparator();

        if(groupSeparatorChar == '.')
        {
            groupSeparator = "\\" + groupSeparatorChar;
        }
        else
        {
            groupSeparator = Character.toString(groupSeparatorChar);
        }

        if(decimalSeparatorChar == '.')
        {
            decimalSeparator = "\\" + decimalSeparatorChar;
        }
        else
        {
            decimalSeparator = Character.toString(decimalSeparatorChar);
        }

        fixedString = formattedString.replaceAll(groupSeparator , "");
        fixedString = fixedString.replaceAll(decimalSeparator , ".");
        number      = new BigDecimal(fixedString);

        return (number);
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Here is how I would do it:

public String cleanDecimalString(String input, boolean americanFormat) {
    if (americanFormat)
        return input.replaceAll(",", "");
    else
        return input.replaceAll(".", "");
}

Obviously, if this were going in production code, it wouldn't be that simple.

I see no issue with simply removing the commas from the String.

share|improve this answer
    
And if the string is not in American format? In Germany, it would be 1.000.000.000,999999999999999 –  Steve McLeod Sep 20 '10 at 14:57
    
@Steve, good call –  jjnguy Sep 20 '10 at 14:57
2  
So you use the locale to clean it of the correct things. –  T.J. Crowder Sep 20 '10 at 14:58
1  
Main problem here is that the numbers could be fetched from different sources each having it's own format. So the best way to do it in this situation would be defining some "number format" for each of the sources. I can't do that with simple replacings as one source can have "123 456 789" format and the other "123.456.789" one. –  Max Sep 20 '10 at 14:59
2  
@Max: "Main problem here is that the numbers could be fetched from different sources each having it's own format." Which argues for, rather than against, your cleaning the input before handing off to code you don't control. –  T.J. Crowder Sep 20 '10 at 15:04
resultString = subjectString.replaceAll("[^.\\d]", "");

will remove all characters except digits and the dot from your string.

To make it locale-aware, you might want to use getDecimalSeparator() from java.text.DecimalFormatSymbols. I don't know Java, but it might look like this:

sep = getDecimalSeparator()
resultString = subjectString.replaceAll("[^"+sep+"\\d]", "");
share|improve this answer
    
Which will give unexpected results for non-American numbers - see the comments to Justin's answer. –  Péter Török Sep 20 '10 at 15:04
    
I know, was just editing my answer when you commented :) –  Tim Pietzcker Sep 20 '10 at 15:05

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